Media/Movie Scripts/Other/French Connection, The (1971)

      THE FRENCH CONNECTION

                           by

          ERNEST TIDYMAN and WILLIAM FRIEDKIN


























DIRECTOR: William Friedkin

PRODUCER: Philip D'Antoni




EXT. LE VALLON

Opening shot - High angle on Lincoln along small bay with
boats.

Ext. Bar - Waist to full figure Pan Right to Left.  Detective
comes out eating pizza, looking around.  He crosses street
and stops against wall of impasse Michael.

He looks O.S. left,

His POV - L.S. of Lincoln behind fishing nets.

Waist shot of Detective looking and eating.

M.S. of Lincoln.

C.S. of Detective looking O.S. Left.

Pan Right to Left with Charnier coming out from Fonfon with
three friends and they walk to the Lincoln.

Pan Left to Right with Lincoln passing in front of the
Detective.

EXT. CAFE LA SAMARITAINE

High angle from balcony.  Zoom on Detective seated at the
cafe, reading a newspaper.

Cut on Lincoln along sidewalk of the cafe, then zoom back to
discover Detective seated.

EXT. MARSEILLE STREETS

Low angle from stairs Rue des Repenties and Pan Left to
Right to Rue Sainte Francoise following the Detective.

Pan Left to Right with Detective from Rue des Repenties to
Rue Baussenque.

Low angle between Rue des Moulins and Rue des Accoules with
Detective passing by.

Ext. Rue du Panier - The Detective comes out from the bakery
camera Right and starts to climb up Rue des Moulins with his
bread.

EXT. STREET

High angle - on No. 50 Rue des Moulins.  Pan Left to Right
with Detective coming up the street with his bread and going
inside his house, starting to open his letter-box.

                                                            2.


INT. CORRIDOR

High angle - complete reverse.  As the Detective starts to
open his letter-box in B.G. a hand pointing a gun moves in
foreground and blows off half of the French Detective's head
with the first shot.

Cut to Nicoli C.S. who just fired.

EXT. A BAR IN BED-STUY - DAY

A large man in a Santa Claus suit and white beard is
entertaining a group of black children.  He leads them in
the singing of a Christmas Carol (Hark the Herald Angels
Sing).  The man is DETECTIVE FIRST GRADE JIMMY DOYLE.  His
attention is split between the children and the activity
inside the bar.

INT. THE BAR - DOYLE'S POV - DAY

The place is crowded with mid-day drinkers.  Dimly outlined
at the far end of the bar are TWO BLACK MEN involved in some
kind of transaction in which a package is exchanged for
money.  As the transaction seems to be completed, cut to

EXT. THE BAR - DAY

Santa Claus (DOYLE) starts to ring his big Christmas bell,
above the singing.  The bell is a signal to DETECTIVE SECOND
GRADE BUDDY RUSSO.  At this moment RUSSO is in the clothes
of a hot dog vendor and is in fact working behind a hot dog
wagon.  At the ringing of DOYLE's bell he takes off his
apron, leaves the wagon, and runs toward the bar.

                         DOYLE
                   (as RUSSO passes him)
            The guy in the brown coat.

INT. THE BAR - DAY

RUSSO enter the bar on the run.  He stops and looks over the
room.

RUSSO'S POV

There are TWENTY or THIRTY MEN at the bar, at least TEN are
wearing brown coats!  The TWO MEN involved in the deal see
RUSSO and start to run.  One (THE BUYER) takes off out of
the back door.  The other (THE PUSHER) jumps over the bar
and heads for the front entrance.

                                                            3.


EXT. THE BAR - DAY

THE PUSHER dashes out past Santa Claus (DOYLE).  RUSSO
follows him and all three give chase.

EXT. BED-STUY TENEMENT ALLEY - DAY

THREE FIGURES running down a New York tenement alley, the
first in flight, the others in pursuit.  We pick up the
incredible clutter of such an alley, mounts of rusting beer
cans, paper bags of garbage bulging and ripping open, old
bed springs, burned out mattresses, etc.

EXT. BED-STUY TENEMENT ALLEY - DAY

Close shot of BLACK PUSHER tripping on the tangle of trash
going up against the wall in his stumble, face toward the
camera, and the figures of RUSSO and DOYLE leaping upon him
from off-camera.  There is a blur or fast struggle as DOYLE
and RUSSO try to get his arms and put him against the wall.
BLACK PUSHER writhes loose and we close in on a knife in his
hand, plunging rapidly into RUSSO'S left forearm.

                         RUSSO
            Son of a bitch!

The words are both warning and a grunt of pain.  As RUSSO
takes the blade and utters the words, we simultaneously go
to DOYLE crouching and snatching his .38 out of the right
ankle holster.

EXT. BED-STUY TENEMENT ALLEY - DAY

Close shot of DOYLE and the BLACK PUSHER, DOYLE pistol-
whipping him into submission with three lightening chops of
the gun to the PUSHER'S head.  DOYLE continues to beat the
man mercilessly into submission.

INT. DOYLE'S CAR - DAY

3-shot of BLACK PUSHER sitting between DOYLE and RUSSO.
DOYLE is at the wheel.  BLACK PUSHER is sitting on his
hands, wrists manacled behind him, his head down and dripping
blood onto the jacket and the canary-yellow turtleneck.  All
three are breathing hard.

                         DOYLE
            What's your name, asshole?

                         BLACK PUSHER
            Fuck you, Santa Claus!

DOYLE hits him across the face.

                                                            4.


                         RUSSO
            Your name is Willie Craven.

BLACK PUSHER doesn't look up.

                         DOYLE
            Who's your connection, Willie?
            What's his name?

No response.

                         RUSSO
            Who killed the old Jew in the
            laundromat?

BLACK PUSHER's brow furrows, looks up just a little.

                         BLACK PUSHER
            I don't...

                         DOYLE
            Ever pick your feet in Poughkeepsie?

                         BLACK PUSHER
            What?

                         DOYLE
            Did you ever pick your feet in
            Poughkeepsie?

                         BLACK PUSHER
            I don't know what you're talkin'
            about.

                         DOYLE
            Were you ever in Poughkeepsie?

                         BLACK PUSHER
            No... yeah...

                         DOYLE
            Did you ever sit on the edge of the
            bed, take off your socks and stick
            your fingers between your toes?

                         BLACK PUSHER
            Man, I'm clean.

                         DOYLE
            You made three sales to your
            roaches back there.  We had to
            chase you through all this shit and
            you tell me you're clean?

                                                            5.


                         RUSSO
            Who stuck up the laundromat?

                         DOYLE
            How about that time you were
            picking your feet in Poughkeepsie?

The BLACK PUSHER'S eyes go to RUSSO in panic, looking for
relief from the pressure of the inquisition.

                         RUSSO
                   (in pain)
            You better give me the guy who got
            the old Jew or you better give me
            something or you're just a memory
            in this town.

                         BLACK PUSHER
            That's a lot o' shit.  I didn't do
            nothin'.

The BLACK PUSHER's eyes are on DOYLE, frozen in confusion
and fear.

                         DOYLE
            You put a shiv in my partner.  Know
            what that means?  All winter I
            gotta listen to him gripe about his
            bowling scores.  Now I'm gonna bust
            your ass for those three bags -
            then I'm gonna nail you for pickin'
            your feet in Poughkeepsie.

EXT. HEADQUARTERS NARCOTICS BUREAU OF THE NYPD 12 OLD SLIP
AND SOUTH STREETS - NIGHT

DOYLE and RUSSO standing side by side on the front steps of
the old First Precinct on the Lower East Side of Manhattan.
RUSSO has his overcoat over his shoulders as a cape.  The
sleeve of his left arm is rolled up over a blood-stained
bandage on the left forearm.

                         DOYLE
            Havin' trouble?  You're a dumb
            guinea.

                         RUSSO
            How'd I know he had a knife.

                         DOYLE
            Never trust a nigger.

                         RUSSO
            He coulda been white.

                                                            6.


                         DOYLE
            Never trust anybody.  You goin' sick?

                         RUSSO
            Not a chance.

RUSSO nods in acceptance of the remark.  The easy, synical
rapport between them is obvious: they are partners in a
business where somebody is always getting hurt and pain is
part of the inventory.

                         DOYLE
            Let's popeye around the Chez for a
            half hour, catch the end of the
            show and a couple drinks.

                         RUSSO
            Some other time Jimmy, I'm beat.

DOYLE reaches into the right side pocket of BUDDY's suitcoat
for a cigarette and matches.  He lights up two in the pause,
sticks one in RUSSO's mouth.

                         DOYLE
            Come on -- one drink.  Whatta you
            say?

                         RUSSO
            Drink this.

                         DOYLE
            Whip it out.

INT. THE CLUB - NIGHT

THE TITLES COMMENCE

                    THE FRENCH CONNECTION

Titles over a close shot of a chorus line, with lots of tits
and ass and lean, long legs in a brassy blare of music.  We
zoom back to the area where DOYLE and RUSSO are beginning to
occupy a table.  RUSSO takes the seat on the right, eyes
immediately on all that ginch, while DOYLE standing, gives
their order.  We do not hear the dialogue but DOYLE asks
RUSSO what he wants BUDDY looks up and says "Cinzano." DOYLE
turns and says "Two of these." DOYLE slips into the chair
opposite RUSSO and the titles roll on.  Unlike RUSSO who is
concentrating on the girls, DOYLE is digging the room and
the people who occupy the tables in it, as if he is the sort
of man who cannot relax until he knows who is around him,
why they are there.

                                                            7.


INT. THE CLUB - NIGHT

A long view from DOYLE's position of the room, a quick
certain survey that stumbles twice; on laughter that seems
too raw and then over a flurry of activity by WAITERS and
CAPTAINS serving a table on the main floor.  DOYLE's
attention is apprehended by the noise and activity that
emanate from the same large table.

                         DOYLE
            I make at least two junk connections
            at that table in the corner.  The
            guy is the stripe combo, I know him
            too.

                         RUSSO
            Hey, I thought we come for a drink.

INT. THE CLUB - NIGHT

A long view of the table with DOYLE and RUSSO very close
foreground, left and right.  DOYLE is leaning on an elbow.

                         DOYLE
            Who is that guy?

                         RUSSO
            Policy man in Queens.

                         DOYLE
            What about the last of the big-time
            spenders.  You make him?

RUSSO's eyes come off the show.  It is a direct line from
DOYLE's gaze to the round, ruddy and arrogant face of SAL
BOCA, the apparent host of the table of EIGHT MEN AND WOMEN,
the Men in dinner jackets with ties tucked under the collars
of blue or white lace-trimmed shirts, the Women in a mixture
of pant suits and Catskills cocktail party dresses, their
hair coiffed towers.

                         RUSSO
            No, you?

                         DOYLE
            Hunh-uh.  Check the bread.  He
            spreads it like the Russians are in
            Jersey.

                         RUSSO
            He probably sells insurance.  Owns
            a chicken farm in Hackensack.

                                                            8.


Zoom in slowly on SAL as he deals tips and orders.  Through
DOYLE's eyes, we go from Guest to Guest at SAL's table,
taking apart their manners and styles as they talk and
laugh, lost in the show chatter.

INT. THE CLUB - NIGHT

DOYLE finishing his drink, still looking at the table.

                         DOYLE
            Dig who's just come over.  The
            creep on the end.

INT. THE CLUB - NIGHT

The camera pans down the table to dig the "creep on the end."

                         RUSSO (VO)
            Jewish Lucky from the Bronx... He
            don't look the same without a
            number across his chest.

INT. THE CLUB - NIGHT

DOYLE close in right profile, SAL's table in the far blurred
background.

                         DOYLE
            Whatta you say we wait and give him
            a tail?

                         RUSSO
            Give who a tail?

                         DOYLE
            The greaser with the blonde.

                         RUSSO
            What for -- you wanna play Hide the
            Salami with his old lady?

                         DOYLE
            Come on -- just for fun --

INT/EXT. DOYLE'S CAR - NIGHT

The view from the back seat of DOYLE's car.  DOYLE is at the
wheel, RUSSO packed uncomfortably into the corner at DOYLE's
right.  Seventy-five yards away on the other side of the
street the canopied entrance of the Club.  A Continental is
parked in front of the club.  The DRIVER leaning on a fender
talking with the DOORMAN.  DOYLE frisks his own pockets for
a cigarette, coming up with a collection of laundry slips,
crumpled notes, toothpicks and matches.

                                                            9.


One of the slips of paper catches his eye as he is going
through the ritual of the cigarette mooch, a slip bearing
the name of a girl.  His attention is really on the entrance
of the Club and both his conversation and the cigarette
business are detached and incidental to the art of waiting
through the stakeout.  He stuffs the cards back into his
pocket.

                         DOYLE
            Monica?  Who's Monica?

                         RUSSO
                   (handing him a cigarette)
            A and A, that's all you're
            interested in -- Arrests and Ass.

As soon as DOYLE has finished lighting the cigarette SAL and
his PARTY come bubbling out of the Club noisily, a little
drunkenly.  SAL waves to the attentive DOORMAN.

DOYLE close, leaning forward over the wheel to put his hand
on the ignition key.  He does not turn it.  He is waiting
for the cover of noise from the starting of SAL's car.
RUSSO is turning the opposite corner of the car into a bend,
his head back, arms across his chest.

                         DOYLE
            Cloudy, I'll lay odds he takes us
            to Little Italy.

DOYLE reaches under his seat for the straw surveillance
hat - throws it up to read ledge of car.

                         RUSSO
            I'm telling you, Popeye, he owns a
            bagel mine in the Bronx.

A long view of the Club entrance.  SAL and ANGIE, a well-
built "classy" blonde with good legs, get into their black
Mercury sedan.  The Mercury takes off towards First Avenue.
We hear DOYLE's car start and we move off after them on the
last blink of tail-lights at the corner.

EXT. BROADWAY - NIGHT

Cabs, Daily News and Times delivery trucks, bakery vans and
a few cruising cabs, one or two passenger cars and a coasting
green and black police cruiser -- this is the 4:30 a.m.
traffic through which DOYLE moves.

A rear-window view of SAL and ANGIE BOCA, in animated
conversation.  His head is turned toward her, his hand
raised in a gesture.  ANGIE is sitting in a corner with her
back to the door, in profile to the back window.

                                                           10.


Her blonde head bobbles with laughter over some remark SAL
has made.

A long overhead view of the two cars wheeling in and out of
the sparse traffic.

Close shot of the license plate on BOCA's car.

Close shot DOYLE staring at license plate, memorizing it.

EXT. RATNER'S - DAY

BOCA and ANGIE exit restaurant, get into their car and drive
off.  Hold for DOYLE's car as it passes through after them.

EXT. MULBERRY STREET - DAY

Side close view of SAL turning south into Mott Street
panning to pick up the Italian names on the candy stores,
funeral parlors, bars, grocery stores, social clubs.

A long view of SAL's car from the DOYLE-RUSSO auto, over the
shoulders of the two cops.  DOYLE is leaning on the wheel of
his car.  He's against the curb about 100 yards behind SAL.

Medium close view of SAL in the middle of Mott Street,
walking quickly toward the opposite side of the street,
hands in the pocket of his white raincoat.  He glances over
his shoulder in the direction of DOYLE's car.

Close of RUSSO who has come awake.  The smart-ass demeanor
has dropped away.  DOYLE turns to him and smiles.  This
district is the heart of every illegal activity in New York.

Close rear view of DOYLE and RUSSO ducking down to the level
of the dashboard, a reflex action.  He couldn't see them at
that distance, although SAL, lighted by his own headlights,
can be seen in the background walking around the cars,
across the sidewalk and stopped at a recessed doorway.

Medium close shot of SAL and partially visible FIGURE at the
doorway.  With another glance up the street, SAL takes
something out of his raincoat pocket and steps up and into
the doorway.

INT. DOYLE'S CAR - DAY

Close from the front of DOYLE and RUSSO low against the
dashboard.

                         DOYLE
            It's a drop!

DOYLE's face, close, light smile.

                                                           11.


Long view of SAL walking down the sidewalk quickly for about
a quarter of a block while the headlights of his car, with
ANGIE apparently driving, move up with him.  At another
doorway, he looks back and then steps inside.

EXT. BROOKLYN BRIDGE - DAY

Long view of SAL's Mercury moving over Brooklyn Bridge.

Close shot of the DOYLE-RUSSO car from RUSSO's side.  BUDDY
now interested, watching.

EXT. BROOKLYN - DAY

Overhead view of cars circling block, first Mercury turning
corner, then DOYLE's Ford.

Long shot of the Mercury pulling up beside line of parked
cars (as seen from DOYLE-RUSSO car) stopping and parking.
Hold on Mercury as SAL and ANGIE get out of it.  SAL locking
it up, and starting to walk toward a line of parked cars.

Close shot from rear seat of DOYLE and RUSSO glancing at
each other.

SAL and ANGIE stop in the street beside beat-up white Dodge.
Without a word they get in.  Hold as they get in, SAL starts
and they begin to drive out of the spot.

Close on DOYLE.

                         DOYLE
            It's startin' to cook, Cloudy, my
            man is cookin'...

A series of impressionist traveling shots of the white Dodge
and DOYLE's Ford moving through Brooklyn Streets, picking up
street signs of areas.

Medium close shot of the white Dodge pulling into the curb.
In near background, a candy-confectionery store.

INT. DOYLE'S CAR - DAY

Close shot of DOYLE and RUSSO in profile driving past the
candy store as SAL and ANGIE open door and go in.

Close shot of DOYLE and RUSSO parked.  DOYLE is looking in
the rear-view mirror while BUDDY is turned around on the
seat, looking out the rear window.

A long shot, from the DOYLE-RUSSO viewpoint of the candy
store.  The door is open, the street is deserted.  Lights
are going on in the little shop.

                                                           12.


Hold on the storefront as SAL appears, this time in a candy
store operator's smock over a white undershirt, baggy slacks.
He's carrying a stack of newspapers.  Zoom in on SAL stacking
the Sunday Times and the Daily News on the rack in front of
the store as ANGIE appears in the doorway.  She's blackhaired
now, the blonde wig gone, also wearing a grey cotton smock
over a plain skirt and sweater, holding a cup of coffee.  We
hold on them for a beat, then

                                            CUT TO:

DOYLE and RUSSO close just looking at each other.  The look
says everything about the freak case they have stumbled into.

EXT. QUAY MARSEILLE SHIPYARD

1) Tight two shot then, 2) cut into blue prints.

                         CHARNIER
            En prolongeant les quais d'une
            trentaine de mètres on pourra
            recevoir des unités d'une cargaison
            de 500 tonnes.

3) While he shows the extension, clean P.O.V. Of each quay.

4) Dolly Left to Right with Notre-Dame in background.  They
fold the blue prints and moves.

                         FOREMAN MARCEL
            Et combien d'hommes supplémentaires?

                         CHARNIER
            Ca fera environ 10 hommes de plus
            par équipe.

                         MARCEL
            Le Syndicat exigera un minimum de 12.

                         CHARNIER
            Quelle importance.  Ce qui compte
            pour moi c'est d'avoir un chantier
            qui puisse recevoir les plus grands
            bateaux du monde.

                         MARCEL
            Dis moi vieille branche?  Comment
            fais tu pour rester si jeune avec
            la vie que tu mènes?

                         CHARNIER
            Quelle vie Marcel?  J'ai plus rien
            foutu depuis que je suis descendu
            de ces cabines.

                                                           13.


EXT. NUNNERY

EXT. CORNICHE - HI-WAY (BERGER)

Pan Left to Right Lincoln driven by Jean with Charnier behind.

EXT. CASSIS CROSSROAD IN FRONT OF MARSEILLE SIGN POST

Lincoln passing by.

EXT. CASSIS HARBOUR FROM CASINO

Pan Right to Left with Lincoln passing by.

EXT. CASSIS ROAD LEADING TO VILLA

Pan Right to Left with Lincoln arriving from main road to
Villa.

EXT. VILLA CASSIS

Camera in front of garage where the Lincoln stops.  Charnier
comes out with gift and walks Right to Left.

EXT. VILLA CASSIS

Pan Left to Right with Charnier walking along terrace with
Cassis bay in B.G., and we discover his wife, Marie.  She
gets up.  Dolly back.

                         CHARNIER
            Bonjour chérie.

They kiss each other and walk arm in arm back to us.

EXT. VILLA CASSIS

Close 2-shot favouring her.  He gives her the gift.

                         CHARNIER
            Tu sais j'ai réfléchi longuement à
            ton cadeau pour le voyage.  Je l'ai
            choisi moi-même.  Tiens.

                         MARIE
            Je peux l'ouvrir tout de suite?

                         CHARNIER
            Si tu veux.

                                                           14.


                         MARIE
                   (opening the gift)
            Oh Alain!  C'est merveilleux!  Tu
            me gâtes.  Je t'aime.  Attends, je
            vais te montrer moi aussi ce que
            j'ai acheté.

                         CHARNIER
            Encore du sho ping!

EXT. VILLA

L.S. Pan Right to left from under the trees following her as
she leaves Charnier to enter in the house.

EXT. VILLA

C.S. of Charnier along the terrace.  He throws a fishing
pole in the sea.

EXT. VILLA

PAN RIGHT TO LEFT with Marie coming back with a new coat.

                         MARIE
            Regarde mon pêcheur de baleine...
            Tu sais il va faire très froid cet
            hiver.

                         CHARNIER
            Avec ça tu pourras le supporter.

                         MARIE
            Mais non, c'est pour toi.

                         CHARNIER
            Pour moi?

                         MARIE
            Regarde, il te va parfaitement bien!

                         CHARNIER
            Formidable!  Sans toi je
            m'habillerais encore en docker.
                   (then, taking off coat)
            Je suis passé voir Françoise.

                         MARIE
            Comment va-t-elle?

                         CHARNIER
            Je n'ai jamais vu tant de sérenité.
            Elle m'a demandé de tes nouvelles
            et si nous étions heureux.

                                                           15.


                         MARIE
            Le sommes nous?

                         CHARNIER
                   (he kisses her)
            Non!

EXT. BOAT - CAR PARK

Complete Pan Left to Right with Lincoln passing in front of
Samaritaine cafe.

Driver pulls out.  Charnier comes out from Lincoln and we
follow him as he crosses Left to Right and jumps into the
boat which moves out.

FROM BOAT

Back shot.  Charnier standing in the moving boat and smoking
as Marseille diminishes in B.G.

OPENING SEA SHOT

From the boat approaching Chateau d'If.

ON PEER

Pan Right to Left as Charnier gets out of boat and starts to
climb up.

High angle thru first stone door with sea in B.G.  Charnier
comes up and turns Right to Left.

High angle -- Pan Left to Right -- Low angle, with Charnier
coming up from 2nd arch to 3rd arch thru which we see the
tower in B.G.

EXT. CHATEAU D'IF - 1ST PLATFORM

Pan Left to Right with Charnier arriving on terrace.

EXT. CHATEAU D'IF - CHARNIER - HIS POV

Nicoli back to us.  He turns left shoulder as we approach to
him.

EXT. CHATEAU D'IF - TWO SHOT

Dolly back preceding Charnier and Nicoli after they meet and
Pan Left to Right to the Rotonde.

                         CHARNIER
            Ca a marché?

                                                           16.


                         NICOLI
            Au poil.

They turn around.

                         CHARNIER
            Sale boulot.

                         NICOLI
            Il fallait le faire.

                         CHARNIER
            Il est en retard.

                         NICOLI
            Je crois qu'on fait une erreur de
            le prendre avec nous.

                         CHARNIER
            Une erreur!  C'est génial.  C'est
            une vedette à la télévision.  Il
            peut aller partout sans être
            soupçonné... En plus il a besoin de
            fric.

                         NICOLI
            J'ai pas confiance en lui.

                         CHARNIER
            Sois gentil avec lui.  On ne sait
            jamais.  Il peut te faire travailler
            à la télévision.

EXT. CHATEAU D'IF

Cut on Devereau arriving.  He sees them.

EXT. CHATEAU D'IF

Pan Left to Right bringing Charnier and Nicoli towards
Devereaux to finish in 3-shot.

                         CHARNIER
            Henri c'est gentil d'être venu.  Je
            vous présente mon associé, Pierre
            Nicoli.  Henri Devereaux.

                         DEVEREAUX
            Enchanté.
                   (they shake hands)
            Alain, j'ai réfléchi à votre
            proposition et j'ai décidé
            d'accepter.

                                                           17.


SURVEILLANCE MONTAGE OF SAL BOCA's activities.  From time to
time DOYLE and RUSSO are visible, but their dialogue is for
the most part VOICE OVER.

INT/EXT. BROOKLYN CANDY STORE - DAY

Various shots of SAL and ANGIE.  Several shots of DOYLE and
RUSSO in the CANDY STORE: reading magazines, having lunch
separately.  They are also seen in the LEATHER FACTORY
across the street observing the CANDY STORE.  Several
CHARACTERS enter the CANDY STORE from time to time and go
into the BACK ROOM.

Following are a series of cuts (MOS) to be used with the V.O.
dialogue of RUSSO and DOYLE.

INT. CANDY STORE - DAY

SAL counts the receipts.  Two or three CUSTOMERS in the BG.

SAL removes a tray of Ziti from the oven.  ANGIE makes an
order to go.

SAL removes garbage from the back area.

                         RUSSO (V.O.)
            Our friend's name is SALVATORE BOCA.
            They call him SAL.  He's a
            sweetheart.  He once was picked up
            on suspicion of armed robbery.
            Tried to hold up Tiffany's on Fifth
            Avenue!  In broad daylight!  Could
            have got two-and-a-half to five,
            but they wouldn't prosecute.  Also
            downtown they're sure he pulled off
            a contract on a guy named DeMarco.

EXT. CANDY STORE - DAY

SAL putting garbage into cans.  Pan and Zoom to DOYLE and
RUSSO in window of FACTORY across the street.

INT. CANDY STORE - DAY

ANGIE carries bowl of hard-boiled eggs from rear of store to
the front.

                         DOYLE (V.O.)
            His old lady?

ANGIE makes a tuna sandwich on a roll.  A cigarette dangles
from her lips.  SAL is in BG at cash register with customer.

                                                           18.


                         RUSSO (V.O.)
            Her name's Angie... Fast filly...
            she drew a suspended for shoplifting
            a year ago... only a kid, nineteen
            according to the marriage license.

From front of store looking to back.

                         DOYLE (V.O.)
            Yeah, nineteen goin' on fifty.
            What else?

RUSSO is at counter eating lunch with three others... ANGIE
serving.  She wears a sleeveless sweater; shows lots of tit.
RUSSO digs... she digs him.  A wise guy comes in, goes to
the back room.  SAL follows.

                         RUSSO (V.O.)
            He's had the store a year an'a
            half... takes in a fast seven grand
            a year.

EXT. CANDY STORE - DAY

POV from FACTORY window... Two Wise Guys in big coats and
hats pull up in a big car.  They enter store.

                         DOYLE (V.O.)
            So what's he doin' with two cars
            and hundred dollar tabs at the Chez?

INT. CANDY STORE - DAY

Angie shooting from back of store towards front.  The Two
Wise Guys enter, go to Back Room.  SAL follows.  They close
door.  DOYLE is at the magazine counter in front.  He sits
down with magazine.  Orders coffee.

                         RUSSO (V.O.)
            The Merc's in his wife's name.
            Dodge belongs to his brother.

WARD'S ISLAND - DAY

A heavy-faced, dirty looking man in a Sanitation Dept.
uniform in a group of men practising with Sanitation trucks.

                         RUSSO (V.O.)
            Lou... he's a trainee at the
            Sanitation School on Ward's Island.
            Served time a couple of years ago,
            on assault and robbery raps.

                                                           19.


SEVERAL SHOTS - DAY

EXT. CANDY STORE

LOU pulls up.  As LOU picks up SAL.  They drive to various
buildings in Brooklyn.  One or the other gets out briefly,
then goes on.  DOYLE and RUSSO watch from DOYLE's car.

SUYDAM STREET

                         DOYLE
            If that's not a drop or a pickup,
            I'll open a charge for you at
            Bloomingdale's.

                         RUSSO
            Make it Alexander's, I like the toy
            department.

                         DOYLE
            Toy wit' this will ya.

EXT/INT. "MICKEY'S TWO DOOR" - DAY

                         RUSSO
            There's about a hundred years'
            parole time in there night or day.

SAL arrives alone.  DOYLE and RUSSO in parked car across
street.

                         DOYLE
            They treat our boy like a king.
            Wonder why he don't bring his old
            lady?

SAL flirts with the BARMAID.

                         RUSSO
            There's your answer...

THROUGH RIDGEWOOD - DAY

Restaurants, stores, etc.

                         DOYLE
            Who's the greaser?

With SAL and his FATHER.

                         RUSSO
            It's his father.

DOYLE and RUSSO in parked car.

                                                           20.


                         DOYLE
            I think we oughta burn him on
            suspicion.

                         RUSSO
            Suspicion of what?

                         DOYLE
            Makin' wine in the basement.
                   (pause)
            He looks like that wop stooge used
            to drive for the Fracisi brothers.

LOU joins them.  He and SAL leave together after each kisses
and embraces the old man.

                         RUSSO
            Lay off with that wop stuff, will
            you?

EXT. WEINSTOCK'S APT. BUILDING - DAY

In the East 80's.  SAL exits.

                         DOYLE
            That's the third time he come here
            this week.  You got anything on the
            building?

DOYLE and RUSSO in parked car.

                         RUSSO
            The building's clean.  I checked
            the tenant list -- Don Ameche, the
            actor lives there -- oh, and
            somebody else.  Do the name Joel
            Weinstock ring a bell?

TIME LAPSE

Late day.  WEINSTOCK leaving building, nodding to doorman.

                         DOYLE
            You're kiddin'

DOYLE and RUSSO in parked car.

                         RUSSO
            No sir -- this is where Joel lives.

                         DOYLE
            He was the bank on that shipment
            outta Mexico three years ago.

                                                           21.


                         RUSSO
            So I've heard.

EXT. CANDY STORE - NIGHT

SAL and ANGIE leaving.

                         DOYLE
            Whatta you know -- he's takin' his
            wife out for a change.

DOYLE and RUSSO in parked car.

INT. LEATHER FACTORY - DAY

Across street from Candy Store.  DOYLE and RUSSO at the
printing machine.

                         DOYLE
                   (at leather printing machine)
            Got a job for me when this is over,
            Mrs. Levene?

They have a view of the Candy Store across street.  Various
people go in and out.  Next to DOYLE, at a stamping machine,
is MRS. LEVENE, the factory owner.

                         MRS. LEVENE
            What are you fellows looking for?
            What do you want from that nice
            candy store?

                         DOYLE
            We have reason to believe it's a
            front for the biggest counterfeiting
            operation in the country.

                         MRS. LEVENE
            What?

                         DOYLE
            That's right.  They're trying to
            steal the formula for Hershey
            bars --

DOYLE continues his work at the print-out machine, while
observing the candy store.

We see SAL leaving the store.  He crosses to his car, near
the RUSSO car.  As he passes it, he sees RUSSO locked in
embrace with a lady in a babushka.  As SAL drives off, we
get a closer look at the "LADY" in the babushka: DETECTIVE
JAMES DOYLE.

                                                           22.


INT. RUSSO'S CAR ON TRIBORO BRIDGE CROSSING TO WARD'S ISLAND

                         DOYLE
            What the hell am I drivin' for?
            I'm a first grade Detective.
            You're a second grade guinea.

                         RUSSO
            I'm wounded.  Oh, oh.

SAL up ahead in the Mercury.

                         DOYLE
                   (at the wheel)
            What?

EXT. WARD'S ISLAND - BRIDGE

The Mercury crossing the bridge to the Island.

                         RUSSO
            He's goin' to Ward's Island.  We'll
            get spotted.  What the hell's he
            goin' there?

DOYLE-RUSSO car B.G.

                         DOYLE
            Maybe he's goin' to see his brother.

                         DOYLE
            Or could be another drop.  I guess
            he gets a free ride.

EXT. BROOKLYN STREET - DAY

A Brooklyn slum street on a morning in November.  It is
about 11 o'clock and relatively quiet.  A scattering of
tenement URCHINS give the street some sound and life.  There
are a couple of dark shops on the street and a bar, all
appearing to be closed.  We look down the street and pick up
DOYLE and RUSSO coming down it, walking very quickly.  They
are heading toward the bar.  A young man is coming out -
they grab him and throw him back.

INT. BAR ROOM - DAY

The Young Man is thrown in, followed by DOYLE and RUSSO.
There are about 20 or 30 PUETRO RICAN and BLACK MEN in the
joint, a couple of BLACK WOMEN.  They are in all manner of
dress.  Half of them are wearing shades.  The bar is noisy
with conversation, laughter and music.

                                                           23.


DOYLE and RUSSO standing in the doorway, DOYLE slightly to
the left, RUSSO a little behind him.  DOYLE's arms are at
his sides.  RUSSO's right hand is crossed over his belt,
under his jacket and on the butt of his .38, ready, waiting
to back his partner's play or respond to any move within the
bar.

DOYLE moving into the bar alone.  He pulls the plug out of
the Juke Box, plunging the room to silence.

                         DOYLE
            Hands on your heads.  Popeye's here!

Twenty men raise hands to their heads as one.  The raggle-
taggle swarm plays a kind of human chicken, refusing to move
until the last moment then stepping out of his way.  One of
the customers doesn't.

                         DOYLE
            What's my name?

                         1ST MAN
            Doyle.

                         DOYLE
            What?

                         1ST MAN
            Mr. Doyle.

                         DOYLE
            Ever pick your feet in Poughkeepsie?

                         1ST MAN
            What?

DOYLE raises his left arm and pushes the MAN aside.  The
MAN's eyes go to RUSSO, off-camera at the door, and back to
DOYLE.  He doesn't resist; he gets in line with the rest of
them, a line formed about four or five feet from the bar,
running the length of it.

Close of DOYLE at the bar, holding an ashcan and skimming
the metal underrailing with one finger, knocking off the
magnetized key boxes into the ashcan.  He isn't even looking
at them.  His eyes are across the bar, staring down the
customers.

Close shot of the ashcan and the little metal boxes clinking
into it.

Close shot of DOYLE, the ashcan now on the bar, opening one
of the boxes, taking out the ten dollar bill, putting it on
the bar.

                                                           24.


Then, opening another, taking out the glassine deck of
heroin.  Then another, containing a glassine deck.  He
empties the glassine envelopes on the bar into a cocktail
mixer which he proceeds to shake.  The shaker is half-filled
with tomato juice.

DOYLE leaning over the bar toward the glaring crowd, pours
the mixture into the ashcan.

                         DOYLE
            Milk shake anyone?

He wiggles his finger.  It is a command for THREE MEN to
step forward.  The MEN do not move at first.

                         DOYLE
            Move ass when I tell you.

They move, shuffling, hesitatingly.  But they move -- TWO
BLACKS and A PUETRO RICAN.

                         DOYLE
            Put it on the bar.

Hands of the THREE MEN going into pockets.

Close of a miscellany of keys, coins, cigarettes going onto
the bar -- with two hypodermics, six or eight marijuana
cigarettes, a small plastic vial of barbiturates.

                         DOYLE
                   (collecting the works)
            All right, you three clowns step
            into those phone booths, you're
            goin' in.  Go on.  Stand in there
            till I'm ready for you.

The three men turn and enter the individual phone booths.
They stand, waiting, like contestants in the $64 Question.

                         DOYLE
            Everybody goes when the whistle
            blows.

RUSSO is with another man from whom he's just taken a set of
works.

                         RUSSO
            What's your story?

                         DANCER
            Gimme a break, Mr. Russo.  I'm in
            show business.

                                                           25.


                         RUSSO
            You're in show business.

                         DANCER
            S'right.

                         DOYLE
            What do you do in show business?

                         DANCER
            I'm a dancer.

                         RUSSO
            All right, get up on that bar and
            dance.

                         DANCER
            What?

                         RUSSO
            Get up on the bar and show me how
            you work.  If I like it you don't
            have to go in.

                         DANCER
            You're for real?

                         JERRY LEON
            Hey man, why don't you let the
            fella alone.

                         RUSSO
                   (a shout)
            Am I talkin' to you -

                         JERRY LEON
            No, but I'm talkin' to you.

                         RUSSO
            I'm tellin' you to shut up and
            stand over there.

                         RUSSO
                   (to Dancer)
            Get up there.

The man climbs up on the bar.

                         DANCER
            I got no music!

                         RUSSO
            Fake it.

                                                           26.


The man goes into a fast tap dance.  But he only gets in a
few steps --

                         DOYLE
            All right, that's enough, you're
            under arrest.

RUSSO pulls the man off the bar, sends him into one of the
phone booths.

DOYLE coming down the front of the bar.  He stops before
another man, who has just come out of the toilet.

                         DOYLE
            What about you?  Can you stand a
            toss?

                         2ND MAN
            I'm clean.

                         DOYLE
            You don't use shit?

                         2ND MAN
            No.
                   (he goes for his wallet)


                         DOYLE
            Did I say you could move that
            hand -- I'm not gonna get stuck am I?

                         2ND MAN
            No - no.

                         DOYLE
            Cause if I do.

DOYLE frisks the man.  Comes up with vial of pills and two
roaches.

                         DOYLE
            Wise guy, huh?  Let's see what else
            you got.
                   (to RUSSO)
            - Buddy!

He collars the man and shoves him towards the toilet.

RUSSO, eyes moving everywhere, hand on the gun.

                                                           27.


                         RUSSO
            If I see any shit on the floor,
            it's yours, so keep your eye on
            your neighbor.

Inside the toilet of the bar.  The MAN is up against the
wall.  DOYLE is only inches away.

The MAN is an AGENT and this is the only way DOYLE can get
immediate information from him without destroying the man's
cover.  Their conversation is in whispers.  And very fast.

                         DOYLE
            How's everything?

                         2ND MAN
            Everything is everything.

                         DOYLE
            How come there's nothing out there?
            That stuff is all milk.

                         2ND MAN
            There's nothing around.  Nobody's
            holding.

                         DOYLE
            I got a name - Sal Boca, Brooklyn.

                         2ND MAN
            Boca?

                         DOYLE
            B.O.C.A.

                         2ND MAN
            Doesn't register.

                         DOYLE
            Got a wife named Angie.

                         2ND MAN
            No, nothing.  There's only some talk.

                         DOYLE
            What?

                         2ND MAN
            Coming in this week, week after.
            Everybody going to get well.

                         DOYLE
            Who brings it?

                                                           28.


                         2ND MAN
            Who knows?

                         DOYLE
            Where do you want it?

                         2ND MAN
            This side.

Door of toilet.  There is a hell of a crash and slamming
behind it.  Door opens and DOYLE steps out over the crumpled
prostrate form of the INFORMER.  He has just decked the man
to continue the protection of the cover.  He pauses halfway
down the line as if he's speculating on beating up another
one because he didn't get any information.  But he decides
that would be futile too.

                         DOYLE
            I'm goin' check on this address in
            the Bronx, if you're bullshitting
            me, it's your ass.

                         RUSSO
            Tell everybody we'll be back in an
            hour.

                         DOYLE
                   (to all)
            We're goin' now!  Goodbye.

EXT. PASSENGER SHIP - DAY

Close shot of DEVEREAUX, New York harbor in the background,
being interviewed by television reporters on his arrival in
the U.S. abroad a passenger ship.  He is smiling, jovial,
charming.

                         REPORTER 1
            How long will you be here?

                         DEVEREAUX
            Not long enough.  Two... perhaps
            three... weeks at most.

Medium close shot of DEVEREAUX and THREE TV REPORTERS, as
they talk, a crane moves into action behind them and lifts
out of hold.  LA VALLE is with DEVEREAUX as Translator and
Interpreter.

                         GIRL TV REPORTER
            Why did you come by ship, Mr.
            Devereaux?

                                                           29.


                         DEVEREAUX
            The next several weeks will be very
            difficult and the middle of the
            ocean is the only place where the
            telephone isn't ringing all the time.

                         REPORTER
            What will be the viewpoint of your
            documentary.

                         DEVEREAUX
            To make a Frenchman feel what it is
            like to be a New Yorker.

                         LA VALLE
            That's enough now, ladies and
            gentlemen.  M. Devereaux is due at
            his hotel in half an hour.

Overhead the Lincoln comes down from the hold of the ship.

EXT. WEST SIDE DRIVE - DAY

A long view of the pier from the opposite (east) side of
West Street, beneath the steel trusses and girders of the
West Side Drive and through the forest of cars that are
parked there, the jam of traffic that develops around every
unloading vessel.  It is a view that takes in the front end
of the Lincoln inching off the pier.  HENRI DEVEREAUX at the
wheel, turns to his right.  We watch until the point of view
on the sidewalk.  ALAIN CHARNIER and PIERRE NICOLI are
standing there watching.  When the car (off-camera) turns
east on the way to the garage, NICOLI glances to CHARNIER.
CHARNIER does not look back.

EXT. DORAL HOTEL - LINCOLN PULLS IN - DAY

INT. POLICE OFFICE - NIGHT

Close shot of WALTER SIMONSON at desk in the large square
office he occupies as a Lieutenant of Detectives in charge
of the Manhattan Narcotics Bureau.  He is the immediate
superior of RUSSO and DOYLE, head of the 200-man narcotics
squad that polices Manhattan.

                         SIMONSON
                   (with coffee cup)
            All that is great -- but you guys
            work Bed-Stuy.  You're not supposed
            to be in Ridgewood.

DOYLE, RUSSO and SIMONSON

                                                           30.


                         DOYLE
            Detach us.  Let us have a shot at
            it, at least until we see if
            there's anything here or not.
            Everybody wants Weinstock, right?
            So maybe here's a lead.  We deserve
            it.

                         SIMONSON
            You couldn't burn a three-time
            loser with what you're bringing in
            here.  You know you stiffs could
            run yourselves an entrapment rap.
            The guy has done nothing -- Brooklyn
            is full of Candy Store guys with
            two cars who like to go to
            nightclubs.

                         RUSSO
            Put this little candy hustler
            together with Joel Weinstock and it
            could be we stumbled into a big
            score.

                         SIMONSON
                   (moves to window)
            Big score!  He's dealin' a few bags
            here and there on the side.

                         DOYLE
            Simonson, I wouldn't be infringing
            on your coffee break if I thought
            he was a nickel and dimer.

                         SIMONSON
            Your hunches have backfired before,
            Doyle.

DOYLE, close, no comment.

Back to SIMONSON.

                         SIMONSON
                   (moves back to stand
                   at desk)
            Jimmy, what the hell's happening
            with you lately?
                   (pause)
            You got more collars than any Narc
            in the bureau.  What was it.  Over
            100 last year?  Terrific.  But who?
                         (MORE)

                                                           31.


                         SIMONSON (CONT'D)
            You stop and shake down a bellboy
            because he's got three joints in
            his sock.  You hit a high school
            kid in short pants who looks like
            he's got a twitch.

RUSSO.  Getting it back on the track.

                         RUSSO
                   (moves in to desk)
            We got information that there's no
            shit in the street -- it's like a
            desert full of junkies with a big
            score coming in to make everybody
            well.

DOYLE

                         DOYLE
            This could be it, Walter.  This
            Candy Store guy, putting on a big
            show in a fancy nightclub with
            known connections all over him.
            Then on our own, after working the
            whole day and night, we tail him
            out to Brooklyn and sit on him for
            a week practically, and who do we
            come up with?  Joel Weinstock.
                   (he leans forward)
            You gotta let us have it.

THREE SHOT - RUSSO, DOYLE, SIMONSON

                         SIMONSON
                   (pause, he turns to RUSSO)
            You really believe all this crap?

                         RUSSO
            I go with my partner.

A pause.

                         SIMONSON
            What'll it take?

                         RUSSO
            First a wire.

                         DOYLE
            Two wires.  One on the store and
            one on his house.

                                                           32.


                         SIMONSON
            You know I have to get a court
            order for wiretaps.

                         RUSSO
            Try... okay?

                         DOYLE
            We know you can do it, Walter.

They start to leave.

Close on SIMONSON.

                         SIMONSON
            Popeye...

Close on DOYLE at the door.  RUSSO beside him.

Back to SIMONSON

                         SIMONSON
            You still pickin' your feet in
            Poughkeepsie?

WIRETAP SEQUENCE "A"

INT. BASEMENT

RUSSO on phones -- checking notes on SAL.  DOYLE reading
comics on cot.  Tape machine clicks on -- tape is activated.
RUSSO sits attentively.

EXT. CANDY STORE - DAY

Shot of wire.

                                                           33.


           SAL (V.O.)                     RUSSO
  What's this crap.  I just          (He raps on table
  spoke to my wife and she           with a coffee cup.
  says you're raisin' me a           Doyle gets up.)
  halfa cent on the cups.        C'mere and lissen to your
                                 big connection.
           WHOLESALER                (DOYLE comes over)
           (V.O.)                He's fightin' with somebody
  Yeah, well you know I          about a halfa cent.
  shoulda raised this here a
  long time ago.  We got a                DOYLE
  inflation period...            How we gonna keep Simonson
                                 from hearin' this?
           SAL (V.O.)
  I got your inflation.  I can            RUSSO
  get the same cups on Delancey  If he does, we'll be back in
  Street for what I been         Bed-Stuyvesant tomorrow.
  payin' you for the last
  year -- That's all I gotta
  do with you guys -- next
  time it'll be two cents on
  the cones, then two cents on
  the seltzer --

           WHOLESALER
           (V.O.)
  C'mon Sal, I got my orders,
  too --

           SAL (V.O.)
  Well, if you can't do better
  than that, you can stick the
  cups.

EXT. AUTO GRAVEYARD (HUNTS POINT AND EAST RIVER) - DAY

HIGH ANGLE: Close shot of CHARNIER, MARIE and LA VALLE
walking slowly together toward the camera.  They are at the
auto graveyard and the scene of an auction of cars towed off
New York streets by the Police Department.  About twenty
other men are walking around, looking at the cars.

A POLICEMAN blows a whistle and the prospective car buyers
gather around the auction trailer in the b.g.

                         LA VALLE
            There are four auto graveyards like
            this one in the other boroughs,
            handling about a thousand vehicles
            a month.  Those that aren't claimed
            are auctioned here once a month.

                         MARIE
            Just for mistakes of parking?

                                                           34.


                         LA VALLE
            No.  Many are involved in crimes
            and confiscated... or just abandoned.
            This is, as you know, your prime
            source of scrap metal, M. Charnier.

                         MARIE
                   (off camera)
            Darling, may I have this one?

Medium close shot MARIE, standing next to an LTD.

                         MARIE
            It looks so lonesome here.

CHARNIER and LA VALLE approach her.

                         CHARNIER
            It would look even more lonesome in
            our garage.

INT. THE AUCTION TRAILER - DAY

Within the large trailer, about TWENTY MEN are seated at two
long benches to each side.  Some are standing to the rear.
At the front, an AUCTIONEER stands at a lectern.  To his
left sits a CLERK at a small table.  The AUCTIONEER wears a
sweater and hat.  The buyers are tough types, young and old.
All have inventory lists.  The atmosphere is informal.  The
CHARNIERS and LA VALLE enter the trailer at the back.

                         AUCTIONEER
            Every car sold today must be
            removed at the purchaser's own
            expense.  We have no keys or
            anything to start the vehicles with.
            You buy 'em as you see 'em and
            where you see 'em.  All right, the
            first car offered is Number 24398.
            A Plymouth sedan.  Do I hear
            fifteen dollars?

The bidding goes up to forty dollars.  A large BURLY MAN
wins the bid.  He goes up to the CLERK and accepts the bill
of sale.

                         AUCTIONEER
            We go to 24399 -- A Pontiac Station
            wagon.  Do I hear ten dollars?

                         LA VALLE
                   (aside to CHARNIER)
            Notice he will never mention the
            year of the car.

                                                           35.


                         AUCTIONEER
            I got a fifteen dollar bid going...
            Do I hear anymore...
            Eighteen... who'll say Eighteen?
            Twenty...
            Twenty-three...
            Anymore...
            Twenty-five.  Twenty-five once --
            Do I hear twenty-eight...
            All right, last call for twenty-
            five...

Close shot of CHARNIER

                         CHARNIER
                   (aside of LA VALLE)
            And these are the cars we're buying
            for shipment?

Close shot of CHARNIER, MARIE and LA VALLE.  They are facing
the AUCTIONEER.

                         LA VALLE
            Yes, sir.  That man in the dark
            jacket is our buyer.

Close shot of THE BUYER, LOU BOCA.  He is very active and
wins the present bid.

WIRETAP SEQUENCE "B"

INT. BASEMENT

DOYLE and RUSSO playing Gin Rummy, listening at each end of
one phone - breaking up.

EXT. HOUSE - NIGHT

Shot of wire.

                         ANGIE (V.O.)
                   (sleepy)
            Where are you?

                         SAL (V.O.)
            Takin' care o' business, honey.

                         ANGIE (V.O.)
            Takin' care o' business -- it's
            after midnight.

                         SAL (V.O.)
            You know I hadda meet some people
            tonight --

                                                           36.


                         ANGIE (V.O.)
            -- Well finish all your meetin'
            people and get back here now -- and
            bring a pizza with you.

                         SAL (V.O.)
            Where'm I goinna get a pizza this
            time o' night?

                         ANGIE (V.O.)
            Well try, okay?

                         SAL (V.O.)
            I don't know where I'm gonna find a
            pizza joint open.

                         ANGIE (V.O.)
            Sal --

                         SAL (V.O.)
            Yeah?

                         ANGIE (V.O.)
            Don't forget anchovies.
                   (she hangs up)


                         SAL (V.O.)
            This broad's crazy!

EXT. WARD'S ISLAND (UNDER WEST ABUTMENT OF THE HELLGATE
BRIDGE)

Pick up CHARNIER, MARIE and MAURICE LAVALLE

As the camera plays over the bridge: (in French)

                         CHARNIER (V.O.)
            It's beautiful.

                         LA VALLE (V.O.)
            It was built in 1917 - and was one
            of the two heaviest bridges in the
            world.  The arch is still the
            largest in the world.

                         CHARNIER
            Who financed it?

                                                           37.


                         LA VALLE
            Two railroads as part of a
            connecting railway which provided
            passage from New England to the
            South.  It was actually the first
            railroad through New York City.

                         MARIE
            Why is it called Hellgate?

                         LA VALLE
            The river at this point is the most
            dangerous on the East Coast.  Years
            ago, hundreds of ships went down
            here.

                         CHARNIER
            If this bridge were in Europe, it
            would be on every tourist's sight-
            seeing list.

                         LA VALLE
            Most New Yorkers never notice it -
            most Americans have never heard of
            it.

                         CHARNIER
            Look how gracefully they conceived
            that arch.  Like a bowstring.  It
            was built from both ends.  With no
            support in the middle.  Beautiful.

                         LA VALLE
            Mmm.

                         MARIE
            Alain is the only man I know who
            can become as enthusiastic about a
            bridge as he can about a woman.

                         CHARNIER
            Not any woman, Marie.  Just one.

EXT. OLD ROAD IN WARD'S ISLAND

CHARNIER, MARIE and LA VALLE walking.

(NEAR GARAGE)

                                                           38.


                         LA VALLE
            I'm afraid the rest of Ward's
            Island isn't nearly as romantic - a
            pollution plant, a hospital, a
            training school for garbage men and
            that area over there, where the old
            cars are kept, prior to being
            processed for shipment to, among
            other places, The Charnier Shipping
            Company, of Marseilles, France.

(NEAR CREMATORIUM)

                         MARIE
            What is that old building?

                         LA VALLE
            Oh, it's been abandoned for years.

                         MARIE
            What was it?

                         LA VALLE
            It was a crematorium.

                         MARIE
            For garbage?

                         LA VALLE
            For dead bodies.

WIRETAP SEQUENCE "C"

INT. BASEMENT

DOYLE on phones.

           CHARNIER (V.O.)
  Allo... Salvatore...

           SAL (V.O.)
  Who's this --

           CHARNIER (V.O.)
  ... Salvatore?...

RUSSO enters with a bag of sandwiches and cigarettes.  DOYLE
waves him to the phone.

                                                           39.


           SAL (V.O.)                     RUSSO
  ... Oh... yes... yeah...       Who is it?
  hello... this is Sal... How
  are ya?                                 DOYLE
                                 Sounds like a foreigner...
           CHARNIER (V.O.)
  Very well... you meet me                RUSSO
  Wednesday at the hotel...          (listening at the
  Okay?                              other phone)
                                 French... It's a Frenchman...
           SAL (V.O.)
  Good... good... great!                  DOYLE
                                 This is what we been waitin'
           CHARNIER (V.O.)       for -- the stuff is here!
  Will I expect you?             It's here!

           SAL (V.O.)
  What time?

           CHARNIER (V.O.)
  Twelve o'clock... yes...

           SAL (V.O.)
  Yes --

The phone clicks off.

DOYLE and RUSSO round each other and jump up and down like
two kids.

INT. WHIP GIRL'S APT.

Close shot of NICOLI's face.  He's being whipped, and is
caught in an ecstasy of pain and pleasure.  The tempo of the
strokes rises.  Suddenly it reaches a crescendo and he
screams out in orgasm.

Close, full-length shot of a nude BLONDE GIRL, wearing only
black boots and silk panties.  She's walking away from the
camera, throwing aside a small cat-o-nine-tails flagellant
whip.  We can hear NICOLI's heavy breathing until the girl
speaks as she moves toward a couch.

Medium close shot of NICOLI, tying his tie shrugging into
overcoat.

Medium close shot of NICOLI, looking at the bills with a
pause to sort out the currency differences, then taking out
five twenties.

Close shot of the WHIP GIRL taking the five then moving up
to the look of annoyance and disappointment on her face.

                                                           40.


                         WHIP GIRL
            You're Fifty Dollars short.

The look of anger turns to one of consternation as NICOLI
reacts to her.

                         WHIP GIRL
            M'sieru - the tab for this scene is
            a hundred and a half.
                   (he moves to door)
            Hey Frenchie - if you don't come up
            with the scratch, you're gonna run
            into my man downstairs.

Medium close shot of NICOLI advancing on the WHIP GIRL as
she backs away and begins to cringe.  He grabs her and hurls
her back across the couch.

Close shot of the GIRL.

                         WHIP GIRL
            Don't hit me.  Don't.  Please.

We hear the door slam as she sobs.

                         WHIP GIRL
            You filthy faggot sonofabitch.

INT. CUTTING ROOM - DAY

Close shot of two pro football players smearing each other
on the field, others falling on top of them.

Medium close shot of DEVEREAUX at a Movie-ola working out
his narration (DIALOGUE IN FRENCH)

                         DEVEREAUX
            This is the new American religion,
            professional football.  It is where
            everybody goes instead of church on
            Sunday to express that peculiar
            American taste for bloodshed and
            violence.

Several close shots of the violent action.

Intercut with faces of the crowd.

Close shot of DEVEREAUX.

                                                           41.


                         DEVEREAUX
            These men, playing a "game" - make
            more money each year than many
            important business leaders, artists
            or government officials.
                   (zoom out)
            It tells us something about this
            country and how its men live, or go
            to war with a smile, and sometimes
            die without a cause.

The phone rings - it is CHARNIER.

                         EDITOR
            It's for you - Alain Charnier.

Hold close up of DEVEREAUX.

INT. MUTCHIE'S BAR - NIGHT

In Lower Manhattan.  There are SIX or EIGHT MATRONS still
there, stevedores and truck drivers.  Most of them are
clustered at the far end of the bar, where MUTCHIE, a gray-
haired gone-to-paunch Irishman with spectacles as thick as
pop-bottle bottoms stands behind the mahogany bar.  The
cluster of customers is involved in a typical New York
saloon argument.

DOYLE is ignoring the debate and watching the television.
He is approached by a small MAN in a long coat and baggy
suit with suspenders.  This is JESUS THE BOOSTER.

                         JESUS
            Hey, Bo.

                         DOYLE
            Hiya, Jesus.

                         JESUS
            Can you use a new suit for
            Christmans?

                         DOYLE
            Whatta you got?

JESUS reaches into his trousers and pulls out three suits
(jackets and pants).  They are of the latest style and
color, and still on hangers!

                         JESUS
            Whatta you?... a 44... 46?

DOYLE examines one of the jackets.

                                                           42.


                         DOYLE
            Where'd you get this fag shit?

                         JESUS
            This is what the tough guys are
            wearin'.  You know I only steal
            from the best.  It's Bonwit Teller.

                         DOYLE
            Pass.

                         JESUS
            Forty dollars -- was $250.

                         DOYLE
            Whyn't you get it dry cleaned and
            burned.

JESUS blends into the crowd and we pick up the dialogue of
MUTCHIE and his cronies, BAD EDDIE, LEE and PUGGY.

                         MUTCHIE
            A big man could alluz beat a little
            man.  That's why Wilt Chamberlain
            could murder Jim Brown if they ever
            fought.

                         BAD EDDIE
            No chance.  Brown'd kill him.

                         MUTCHIE
            Chamberlain's seven foot tall,
            right?  He's got a twelve-foot
            reach.  It's geophysics.  He's
            punchin' down on you with leverage.
            He cave your chest in.

                         BAD EDDIE
            Best I ever seen was The Rock.  He
            was the calmest and the meanest.
            Guys like Sugar'd be pukin' before
            a fight.  Jake LaMotta'd be pukin'.
            Marciano was calm like he was goin'
            to church.  What about the night he
            fought LaStarza?  He hit him so
            hard he broke the blood vessels in
            LaStarza's arms.  He was the
            strongest meanest bastard ever lived.

                         PUGGY
            Hey, Mutchie, give us another bullet.

MUTCHIE pours him a straight Scotch in a shotglass.

                                                           43.


                         MUTCHIE
            Blackjack Burns coulds been the
            greatest ever --

                         PUGGY
            -- He was a stone tanker.

                         MUTCHIE
            That's right, he couldn't fight
            legit.  One night at the Garden
            about 1950, '51 -- he fought either
            Jake LaMotta or Gus Lesnevich, I
            think it was -- he took one o'
            those cream puff punches in the
            sixth -- the laziest left you ever
            seen -- missed him entirely.  Down
            goes Blackjack without even workin'
            up a sweat and the whole Garden
            gets up in its feet and I swear to
            Christ, everybody starts singin'
            "Dance With Me Henry."

                         LEE
            I fought a guy in Cleveland once.
            I knew he was a dirty fighter so I
            stick a crowbar in my crotch.
            Right here.  Second round he gives
            me a shot -- Boom -- he breaks his
            hand, the fight's over.

                         PUGGY
            Fuck it, I like nitroglycerin,
            that's my game.

                         MUTCHIE
            What about you, Doyle?  Who's the
            best fighter you ever seen?

                         DOYLE
                   (a few drinks behind him)
            Willie Mays.

                         BAD EDDIE & LEE
            Willie Mays?!

                         DOYLE
            With a baseball bat!  One swing!
            Knock your fuckin' head off.

TIME LAPSE.  The DRINKERS are gone.  MUTCHIE is at the bar
cleaning up.  DOYLE is in the open adjoining kitchen area
cooking breakfast.

                                                           44.


                         MUTCHIE
            What ya doin' out so late?  Hidin'
            from the cops?

                         DOYLE
            I hear the health department is
            going to close this joint for
            selling dirty beer.  I come by to
            help you carry out your money.

                         MUTCHIE
            They'll close you down if they ever
            get a look at those busted-valise
            broads you run with.

                         DOYLE
            You want some eggs.

                         MUTCHIE
            Why not?

                         DOYLE
                   (looking around for bacon)
            Hey, Mutch!  You want bacon?

                         MUTCHIE
            Yeah!

                         DOYLE
                   (rattling pans,
                   looking around)
            Where the hell is it?

                         MUTCHIE
            Where the hell do you think it is,
            potato head?

DOYLE opens the door to the icebox.

                         MUTCHIE
            No wonder there's so many Mafia
            around.  Ya couldn't find a Puerto
            Rican in Spanish Harlem.

TIME LAPSE.  Almost morning.  Close on DOYLE and MUTCHIE
eating bacon and eggs.  MUTCHIE is standing behind the bar
as he eats, DOYLE is sitting in front of it.  They both have
a bottle of beer.

                                                           45.


                         MUTCHIE
            I got this little chick I'm tryin'
            to hit on.  She's about 20, 21... I
            take her to Jilly's last night and
            she's tellin' me about how she
            wants to settle down one day, get
            married... I says, "Hey, this is
            1971, baby, I'm just a dirty old
            man lookin' to score with some
            pussy."

                         DOYLE
            Strike out, eh?

                         MUTCHIE
            Yeah.  In the late innings.  Ya
            look like a night's sleep wouldn't
            kill ya.

                         DOYLE
            A piece of ass wouldn't kill me.

                         MUTCHIE
            When ya go back on?

                         DOYLE
            Morning.  Sometime.

                         MUTCHIE
            Whyn't ya stretch out on the pool
            table for a couple hours.  The kid
            comes in at six will wake ya.  A
            couple eggs and a beer is cheaper
            than keepin' a dog around the joint.

EXT. MUTCHIE'S BAR - DAY

Close of DOYLE going to his car.  He stops for a light.
DOYLE is red-eyed and in need of a shave.  He fidgets
through his pockets looking for a cigarette but doesn't find
one.  As he drives along a GIRL CYCLIST comes into view
alongside.

Our view is DOYLE's view of her long, lean tapered legs.  If
he looks further, and DOYLE always looks further, he will
see there is a bra-band sweater covering her well-formed
breasts.  The pendulous swing is there as she bends over the
handlebars.

Close front view of DOYLE looking back to the light, then
back to the legs.

Close outside view, the cyclist, of DOYLE leaning out the
window with his badge in his hand.

                                                           46.


                         DOYLE
            You got a pedaller's license?

                         GIRL
            What?

                         DOYLE
            You're under arrest.

INT. SIMONSON OFFICE - DAY

Medium close shot of RUSSO and SIMONSON.  PHIL KLEIN, a
federal narcotics agent, is reading aloud from an article in
the New York Daily News.  MULDERIG is listening and sipping
coffee.

Close shot of BILL MULDERIG, a Fed narcotics agent.

                         MULDERIG
            Whatta you got -- four more years,
            Walter?

Medium close of SIMONSON and RUSSO

                         SIMONSON
            Three.

Close shot of MULDERIG.

                         MULDERIG
            Christ, by the time you get out all
            this shit'll be legal.

Wide shot of room, taking in SIMONSON, RUSSO, MULDERIG and
PHIL KLEIN.  SIMONSON hands BUDDY a stack of warrants.

                         SIMONSON
                   (rises, to RUSSO)
            The judge gave you ten days on
            these.  Klein and Mulderig will be
            sitting in for the Federals.  Tell
            Doyle they'll make all the buys,
            and that they're to be kept informed
            of everything that goes down.

SIMONSON turns to MULDERIG.

                         SIMONSON
            You know Doyle, don't you Bill?

Close of MULDERIG.

                                                           47.


                         MULDERIG
                   (rises)
            Sure, I know Popeye.  The Master of
            undercover, whose brilliant idea of
            disguise is to limp into a room on
            his left foot and limp out on his
            right.  Whose brilliant hunches
            cost the death of a good officer --

Close of RUSSO

                         RUSSO
            If that's how you're coming in, why
            not stay home and save us all a lot
            of grief.

MULDERIG, close.

                         MULDERIG
            That's just my opinion.

RUSSO, close.

                         RUSSO
            Whyn't you shove it up your ass!

EXT. DOYLE'S APARTMENT BUILDING - DAY

Long shot of RUSSO approaching housing project group of
buildings.  This is where DOYLE lives.

INT. HALLWAY TO DOYLE'S APARTMENT

RUSSO rings the bell.  No response.  He knocks.  Again
nothing.  He hears a shower working inside the apartment.

                         RUSSO
            Popeye.

No answer.

                         RUSSO
            Popeye.

                         DOYLE
                   (off, weakly)
            Yeah.

                         RUSSO
            It's Cloudy.  Open the door.

                         DOYLE
                   (off)
            I can't.

                                                           48.


                         RUSSO
            Why not?

                         DOYLE
                   (off)
            Let yourself in.

RUSSO reaches into his jacket pocket and gets a celluloid
card, his PBA card, which he slides into the door at the
lock.  He gives it a juggle and the lock is free but the
door moves grudgingly.

INT. DOYLE'S APARTMENT - DAY

The door to DOYLE's apartment, a close view from inside.
There's a bike propped against it and BUDDY RUSSO is trying
to push it open from the outside.

                         RUSSO
                   (behind door)
            What the hell you got holding the
            door?

The bike teeters and falls with a crash and RUSSO comes into
the room puzzled, exasperated.

INT. APARTMENT - RUSSO'S POV - DAY

DOYLE is anklecuffed to the bedpost at the foot of the bed.

                         RUSSO
            What happened to you?

                         DOYLE
                   (sleepy)
            The crazy kid handcuffed me to the
            bed.  With my own cuffs.

The shower goes off.  RUSSO puts the bike upright on its
stand and squeezes the horn, which makes a loud beep.

The BIKE GIRL appears in the bathroom door, wrapped in a
towel.

                         BIKE GIRL
            Oh!

RUSSO sees key on dresser - tosses it to DOYLE.  There are
clothes all over the place, the GIRL's cycling outfit,
DOYLE's pants and shoes and socks.  The decor is completely
impersonal.  RUSSO looks up.

                                                           49.


                         RUSSO
                   (looking at scrapbook
                   on dresser)
            You oughta get plastic covers for
            this stuff like I did - your
            scrapbook's a mess like everything
            else in your life.

RUSSO goes to chair.

                         DOYLE
            Gimme my pants.

RUSSO, who is half sitting on them, pulls the pants loose
and hands them to DOYLE.

                         DOYLE
            You got the warrant?

                         RUSSO
                   (sitting)
            We also got Bill Mulderig and Phil
            Klein.

Close on DOYLE, buttoning his pants.

                         DOYLE
            What do we need those pricks for?

Medium close on RUSSO picking around through the clothes,
coming up with a pair of panties.  He holds them out.

                         RUSSO
            Because by actual count our bureau
            has exactly nine hundred eighteen
            dollars and fifty-four cents to
            make buys and Mulderig's Feds can
            get all of Uncle Sam's money he
            wants by just asking.

DOYLE sitting on bed, strapping the holster on his ankle.
He checks his gun.

                         DOYLE
            Throw 'em in the bathroom, will you?
            How good are the warrants?

                         RUSSO
                   (on the move down
                   hall, at bathroom door)
            Sixty days.  Here.  Don't mention it.

                                                           50.


DOYLE is checking various items that go in his briefcase -
notebook, handcuffs, book of laws, field reports, pencils,
binoculars, candy bars, etc.

Medium close shot of RUSSO looking toward the bathroom door.

                         RUSSO
            Hi!

RUSSO looks back to DOYLE.  There is the sound of a kickstand
being kicked back in place, the door opening and the GIRL
leaving.

Medium close shot of DOYLE tying the shoes, wincing.  Looking
up to the departing GIRL.

                         RUSSO
            Drive carefully!

EXT/INT. RUSSO'S CAR - DAY

Close shot of BILL MULDERIG in back seat.  BUDDY is in
front, next to DOYLE at the wheel.

                         MULDERIG
            Strictly small potatoes.

We can see DOYLE working to keep up with the black Mercury
as they cross the Brooklyn Bridge in fairly heavy traffic.
The Mercury cuts around in and out, DOYLE plunges after him.

                         MULDERIG
            You really know how to pick 'em,
            Doyle.

RUSSO turns his head in anger.

                         MULDERIG
            Still wearing your gun on your ankle?

No answer.

                         MULDERIG
            Somebody told me the reason you did
            that was so's when you met a chick
            and rubbed against her she wouldn't
            know you were a cop.

No answer.

                         MULDERIG
            I said that was bullshit.  It must
            be some kind of fast-draw gimmick
            or something.

                                                           51.


                         RUSSO
            Knock it off, Bill.

                         MULDERIG
            He's gettin' too far ahead.  You're
            gonna lose him.

DOYLE cuts into the next lane to a lot of horn-blowing and
comes to a dead, screeching stop.  DOYLE sits up sharply
erect in the seat, craning to see where SAL is going.  He
throws open the door and hurls himself out.

EXT. BROOKLYN BRIDGE - DAY

Rear medium close shot of DOYLE climbing up on the side of
the car to look ahead, then jumping down and running off.

DOYLE running as hard as he can.

Medium close side shot of SAL turning off the bridge onto
the FDR Drive, moving quickly and smoothly uptown.

DOYLE running to a stop, and staring ahead.  Breathing hard,
horns are blowing on the bridge and they drown out the words
as he curses, "Dirty Sonofabitch."

INT. RUSSO'S CAR - DAY

RUSSO is on the blower.

                         RUSSO
            Phil -- it's Cloudy -- we lost
            him --

Static comes over the two-way radio.

EXT. BOCA'S CAR COMES OFF RAMP, PAN TO

INT. KLEIN'S CAR - DAY

KLEIN is parked on Pearl Street below the Brooklyn Bridge.

                         RUSSO (V.O.)
            He just got off the Bridge - He's
            all yours if you can find him.
            Sonofabitch!

KLEIN starts his car.

EXT. A PARKING GARAGE IN THE EAST 40'S - DAY

SAL emerges from the garage and heads toward Madison Avenue.
He passes a man looking in a store window, PHIL KLEIN.
KLEIN follows him.

                                                           52.


EXT. A STREET IN THE EAST 40'S - DAY

SAL stops abruptly at the corner and turns around.  KLEIN is
forced to pass him and cross the street.

SAL crosses the street to his left, at a right angle to KLEIN.

EXT. MADISON AVENUE - LATE DAY

SAL moving north on Madison Avenue.  He is walking in a
triangular trap of foot surveillance.  We begin to learn
this when we fall back twenty feet behind SAL and pick up
the figure of JIMMY DOYLE, moving at exactly the same pace.
While he keeps looking forward after SAL, he also looks
regularly to the left, across to the West side of Madison
where we quickly zoom in on the figure of BILL MULDERIG, who
is on an even line opposite SAL and moving almost precisely
in step with the subject of their surveillance.  MULDERIG
keeps an eye on SAL but is also glancing north ahead of SAL
to BUDDY RUSSO, who is 20 or 30 feet ahead of SAL, thus
forming the triangle of the A-B-C tail.

SAL bobbing along.

DOYLE following.

MULDERIG keeping pace.

RUSSO up front.

SAL suddenly turning East at the Northeast corner of 46th
Street, the block occupied by the Roosevelt Hotel.

MULDERIG yanking at his right ear.

RUSSO spinning around, hurrying back toward the corner.

DOYLE turning East at the Southeast corner of 46th Street.

RUSSO coming around the corner looking to DOYLE.

DOYLE indicating the Roosevelt entrance with his chin while
MULDERIG comes up to join DOYLE.

RUSSO moving quickly into the Roosevelt entrance on 46th
Street between Madison and Vanderbilt.

INT. ROOSEVELT LOBBY - DAY

Roosevelt lobby stairs with ALAIN CHARNIER, PIERRE NICOLI,
SAL greeting.

                         CHARNIER
            Excuse me.

                                                           53.


                         RUSSO
                   (he is moving through
                   the jam they form on
                   the stairs)
            Excuse me.

We move into the lobby of the Roosevelt and then spin around
quickly, to watch CHARNIER, NICOLI and SAL moving upstairs
and out the door.

EXT. DAY

A distant view from the Northeast corner of 46th Street and
Madison Avenue of the Roosevelt Hotel marquee and the three
men under it, CHARNIER, NICOLI and SAL.  They are in animated
conversation.

DOYLE and MULDERIG on the point-of-view corner across
Madison, MULDERIG with his back to the camera, DOYLE talking
and watching over Mulderig's shoulder.

Close shot DOYLE's face, eyes bright with excitement.

Long view of CHARNIER, NICOLI and SAL under the marquee from
DOYLE's view, zooming in on CHARNIER, who continues to talk,
look up, then look back to SAL.

                         DOYLE
            You take Sal.  I'll stick with the
            beard if they split.

EXT. MADISON AVENUE - DAY

Rear view of ALAIN CHARNIER and PIERRE NICOLI strolling
slowly down Madison Avenue in the Forties.

An overhead view of the pair, CHARNIER and NICOLI, including
DOYLE 20 or 30 yards behind, RUSSO across the street, even
with him.

CHARNIER and NICOLI window-shopping at Walter's Electric,
49th and 3rd Avenue.

RUSSO looking quizzically, puzzled, from a doorway.

CHARNIER and NICOLI are engaged in a running conversation
that we cannot hear.  But what CHARNIER is saying is simply
that he wants to get a pack of cigarettes before they turn
back and stop for dinner.

RUSSO looking to DOYLE for a signal.

                                                           54.


EXT. A CIGAR STORE - DAY

DOYLE already beginning to feel the cold, rubbing his hands
together, at the front of the place CHARNIER and NICOLI have
entered, trying to figure it out as CHARNIER and NICOLI
emerge, CHARNIER ripping the cellophane off a pack of
cigarettes, and they turn back in DOYLE's direction.

DOYLE, face to face with CHARNIER and NICOLI.  Straining to
hear, he picks up a few words of French.  Without losing
stride he steps off the curb and cuts across the street,
moving south, away from them, as they come north.  But
halfway across the street, we pick up RUSSO coming in his
direction, sharp enough to pick up the tail where DOYLE had
to drop it.

EXT. RESTAURANT - DAY

Medium close view through window of ALAIN CHARNIER and
PIERRE NICOLI sitting at a table near the front windows of a
small restaurant.

EXT. STREET - DAY

A long shot of street zooming in on JIMMY DOYLE who is
freezing his ass off in the shadows of a doorway across the
street from the restaurant.  He is dancing from one foot to
the other, his shoulders hunched, occasionally cupping his
hands to his ears.

INT. RESTAURANT - DAY

A medium close shot of WAITER holding a bottle of Sainte
Emillion out for CHARNIER's inspection.  CHARNIER looks,
frowns, shakes head negatively.

DOYLE's feet.  He's standing on one foot, the other raised
and he's squeezing it with a chapped hand, as if trying to
get circulation back into it.

INT. RESTAURANT - DAY

Medium close shot of NICOLI watching the WAITER scoop coq au
vin onto his plate.

Close shot of CHARNIER taking a large forkful of food into
his mouth, chewing and nodding at NICOLI.

EXT. STREET - DAY

Medium shot of DOYLE looking up to RUSSO who comes bearing a
paper bag which he hands to DOYLE.

                                                           55.


Medium close shot of RUSSO standing in front of DOYLE while
DOYLE fishes a piece of pizza out of the bag and lets it
fold into his mouth, then licks his fingers.

                         RUSSO
            You want the red or the white?

                         DOYLE
            Pour it in your ear.

EXT. RESTAURANT - DAY

Medium close view of CHARNIER through the window of the
restaurant, sipping expresso.

INT. RESTAURANT - DAY

Close shot of the pastry tray, rows of Napoleons, strawberry
and peach tarts, a frothing-frenzied rum cake, etc.

NICOLI close, looking like he's about to have an orgasm,
glancing toward CHARNIER and then the tray.

EXT. RESTAURANT - DAY

Close shot of RUSSO peering at the restaurant.  DOYLE's face
right behind him, peering over RUSSO's shoulder, trying to
drink coffee from a paper container and also moving slightly
against the cold and the pain of the shoes.

EXT. FIRST AVENUE - DAY (EXT. COPAIN)

Rear long view of CHARNIER and NICOLI on Madison in the
Forties strolling to a corner where NICOLI is splitting for
the Edison Hotel (West 46th Street) while CHARNIER goes on
to the Westbury on upper Madison.  They part with a wave and
a nod.  Hold on them as BUDDY RUSSO comes into view, moving
off after NICOLI.  DOYLE follow CHARNIER.

EXT. WESTBURY HOTEL - CHARNIER ENTERS - DAY

INT. WESTBURY HOTEL - DAY

Close shot of the elevator floor indicator rising from 1 to 6.

Medium close shot of DOYLE turning away from the elevator
doors and walking toward the registration desk.

Close shot of the DESK CLERK.

                         DESK CLERK
            Yes sir?

                                                           56.


Medium close shot of DOYLE leaning on elbow on the counter,
half-turned to keep an eye on the elevators.

                         DOYLE
            That guy just walked in.  What's
            his name?

Close on CLERK and DOYLE.

                         DESK CLERK
            I'm sorry, I don't know who you mean.

                         DOYLE
                   (showing badge)
            He got off on six.

                         DESK CLERK
            We have four rooms and six suites
            on six.  There's a man in almost
            every one of them.

Close of DOYLE.

                         DOYLE
            Little shorter than me.  Well-
            dressed.  About forty-five or fifty
            with salt-and-pepper hair, a beard.

Close of CLERK.  Thinks it over.

                         DESK CLERK
            There's nobody like that on six.

DOYLE AND CLERK

                         DESK CLERK
            Perhaps he's visiting a guest.

                         DOYLE
            No, I figure he stays here.  Where's
            your registration?

CLERK gets out registration log book, goes through list as
DOYLE waits.

                         DESK CLERK
            There may be two... no, three who
            could fit it.

                         DOYLE
            Names.

                                                           57.


                         DESK CLERK
            A Mr. Paul Ganapolos, he's here
            alone.

                         DOYLE
            Where from?

                         DESK CLERK
            Des Moines.

                         DOYLE
            What's he do?

                         DESK CLERK
            Businessman.  Owns a department
            store in Des Moines, I think.

DOYLE is taking down the information on a pad.

                         DESK CLERK
            Mr. and Mrs. Alain Charnier, would
            be another.  He's in shipping.

                         DOYLE
            Yeh?  Who else?

                         DESK CLERK
            And a Mr. Michael Lowenstein, I
            don't know what he does.

                         DOYLE
            This Charnier guy.  He's in shipping?

                         DESK CLERK
            I think so.  But they're in Room
            408.  On the fourth floor.

Close of DOYLE.

                         DOYLE
            Where's he from?

CLERK

                         DESK CLERK
            Marseilles.

DOYLE AND CLERK

                         DOYLE
                   (gives him a dumb look)

                                                           58.


                         DESK CLERK
            That's in France.

                         DOYLE
            Yeah, I know.

EXT. WESTBURY HOTEL ON MADISON AVENUE - NIGHT

Medium close shot of DOYLE standing in another doorway, this
one in Madison Avenue, opposite and a little up the street
from the Westbury.  It is about 2 o'clock in the morning and
there's not much traffic.  DOYLE looks like a man almost too
tired to stand.  We hear a car pull up (off camera).

INT. RUSSO'S CAR - NIGHT

View from the front seat of a sedan of DOYLE falling into
the corner of the back seat.  RUSSO reaches across the seat
from the camera to hand DOYLE a brown paper container of
coffee.  He opens it between his knees and scalds his mouth
with it.  RUSSO hands over another gift, a pint of Canadian
Club.  DOYLE takes a big swig.

Rear close view of BILL MULDERIG at the wheel of the car,
looking at DOYLE in the rear-view mirror.

                         MULDERIG
            You about ready for a break?

A view of MULDERIG at the wheel, RUSSO twisted around in the
seat, looking back at DOYLE and putting the cap back on the
bottle.  When DOYLE isn't sipping at the coffee-whiskey,
he's looking out the window of the car at the entrance of
the hotel.  He looks beat.

                         DOYLE
            The guy's a frog -- I'm pretty sure.
            Also he made me.  Stayin' on four
            but went up to six -- cute.

                         RUSSO
            The other guy's a frog too.  Checked
            in at the Edison.  Had a hooker
            sent up.

                         MULDERIG
            Christ you should o' collared him
            right there.

                         DOYLE
            Who's on him?

                         RUSSO
            Phil Klein.

                                                           59.


                         DOYLE
            What about Sal?

RUSSO

                         RUSSO
            We put him to bed for the night.

MULDERIG

                         MULDERIG
            Why don't you do the same, Doyle?
            You look like shit.

DOYLE AND MULDERIG - INTERCUT

                         DOYLE
                   (to MULDERIG)
            Look.  My partner and I found this
            case and I don't want no Feds
            screwing it up.

                         MULDERIG
            Case?  So far I haven't seen a damn
            thing.

                         DOYLE
            Bill, keep shootin' your mouth off
            and I'll knock you into the middle
            of next week.

RUSSO, close.

                         RUSSO
            Jimmy, cool it.  Nothin's goin'
            down tonight.  Cop a few zzz's
            while you can.

Close shot, DOYLE.

INT. WEINSTOCK'S APARTMENT - NIGHT

Close shot of CHEMIST with a small lab layout spread in
front of him -- burner, test tubes, etc.  The MAN's wearing
an ordinary business suit and both the table and the
background indicate that this is not a lab, but somebody's
library or den -- and a fashionable one, with photos, a
signed picture of Lyndon Johnson, etc., on the panelled walls.

The CHEMIST is running a Thiele test on a small mound of
powder.  Heroin from CHARNIER's shipment.

Medium close shot of JOEL WEINSTOCK and SAL BOCA sitting
opposite the CHEMIST.

                                                           60.


SAL has a glass of beer in front of him, WEINSTOCK a brandy
snifter containing a splash of amber cognac.  Both are
interested; SAL quite nervously.

The CHEMIST immerses a capillary tube, a tiny instrument the
size of a needle into an open kilo of heroin.

He pours a small quantity of mineral oil into a burnmeister
test tube and preheats the oil over the open flame of a tiny
alcohol lamp.

He removes a 15-in thermometer from its leather case,
fastens the capillary tuve (now totally immersed in the
heroin) to the bulb of the thermometer with a rubber band.

He places the bulb, with capillary attached, into an open
rubber stop and inserts the entire apparatus into the
burnmeister tube, about three inches in.

With a small metal clamp he holds the rig over the lamp.

We watch closely with the CHEMIST, WEINSTOCK and BOCA as the
white heroin powder slowly, agonizingly dissolves into the
mineral oil and

The mercury rises slowly up the thermometer to 220° - 230°.

The faces of the three men are filled with wonder and
anxiety.  As the mercury continues to rise they become a
cheering section, rooting the hometeam home.

The longer it takes for the powder to dissolve, the purer
the heroin.  The mercury stops at 240°!

                         CHEMIST
            Absolutely dynamite!  89.5 proof!
            Best I've ever seen!  If the rest
            is like this, you'll be dealing for
            two years on this load.

Close on WEINSTOCK, relaxed, smoking a large cigar.

                         WEINSTOCK
            Retail is not my end of the business.
            Are you telling me it's worth the
            half million?

Medium close of the CHEMIST.

                         CHEMIST
            How many kilos?

                         SAL
            Sixty.

                                                           61.


                         CHEMIST
            Six kilos at eight big ones a
            kilo...
                   (he nods)
            I'd say it should be able to take a
            seven to one hit in the street.

                         SAL
            By the time it gets down to nickel
            bags it's at least thirty-two
            million!

Medium close of WEINSTOCK and BOCA.

                         WEINSTOCK
            Thank you, Howard.  Take what's
            left there with you and goodnight.

The CHEMIST packs his apparatus and leaves.

                         SAL
            I guess we got a deal, eh?

Medium close shot of WEINSTOCK alone, appraising BOCA.

                         WEINSTOCK
            We got a test.  A deal for half a
            million dollars, maybe.

SAL, whose cool is easily shattered.

                         SAL
            Joel, the man is in a hurry.  He
            wants the bread and he wants to go
            back to France.  He ain't gonna
            hang around and play games.  He's
            one o' the shrewdest cats I ever
            run across.

WEINSTOCK, close.

                         WEINSTOCK
            What am I, a shmuck?  What's the
            hurry?  He could see a couple of
            shows and visit the top of the
            Empire State Building.

INTERCUT SAL, WEINSTOCK

                         SAL
            Joel, don't jerk me.  I spent a lot
            o' time settin' this one up.

                                                           62.


                         WEINSTOCK
            So whatta you want a badge?  It's
            your first major league game Sal.
            One thing I learned, move calmly,
            move cautiously.  You'll never be
            sorry.

                         SAL
            I been damn careful up to now.

                         WEINSTOCK
            Which is why your phone lines are
            tapped and the Feds are crawlin'
            all over you like flies.

                         SAL
            I'm straight, Joel.  They haven't
            got shit on me.  Look, I'm tellin'
            you, he'll take the deal somewhere
            else.

WEINSTOCK

                         WEINSTOCK
            He could go someplace else with his
            sixty kilos of heroin and see how
            easy it is to pull together a half
            million cash.  He wouldn't find
            there was any hurry to do this kind
            of business.

SAL, a little desperate.

                         SAL
            Look, the stuff is here.  We could
            set up the switch in an hour.  I'm
            tellin' you, Mr. Weinstock, he'll
            split if we don't move.  This guy
            is everything they say he is.

WEINSTOCK taking SAL apart with his eyes over the cigar.

                         WEINSTOCK
            What about you, Sal?  Are you
            everything they say you are?

Close of SAL's worried face.

EXT. NEIGHBORHOOD STREET - NIGHT

Close side view of DOYLE driving; popeyeing right and left,
looking for everything and nothing.

                                                           63.


View over DOYLE's right shoulder through windshield of a
young Black HOOKER leaning against a lamppost, smiling at a
passing PEDESTRIAN.  Hold on her as the car moves on,
DOYLE's head turning as he continues to move with the traffic.

Rear close view of DOYLE leaning over the back seat, looking
as he backs the car.

Close shot of the HOOKER looking up smiling, then the smile
fading.

Medium close view of DOYLE and the HOOKER.

                         DOYLE
            You own that lamppost?

                         HOOKER
            No.

                         DOYLE
            Then how come you're leaning on it.

Close shot of HOOKER.

                         DOYLE
            I ever bust you?

                         HOOKER
            I never seen you before.

DOYLE and the HOOKER.

                         DOYLE
            Get your ass in the car.

DOYLE looking right and left, the form of the GIRL climbing
into the vehicle.  He puts surveillance hat on back seat.

INT. DAN'S LUNCH - DAY

DOYLE is standing at an island counter in a coffee-doughnuts
joint.  The COUNTERMAN is paying no attention to him but is
instead emptying coffee from a large dispenser into a pot.

                         DOYLE
            You gonna wait on me or am I gonna
            sit here all day?

The COUNTERMAN responds quickly to DOYLE's voice.

Close shot of DOYLE biting into a huge jelly doughnut, the
jelly squeezing out onto his fingers.

                                                           64.


A kid pushes a broom past, getting rid of a collection of
cigarette butts, etc.

                         DOYLE
            Hey!

Close shot of KID, about 16, looking up from the broom
toward DOYLE.

                         DOYLE
                   (off camera)
            C'mere... C'mere!

Medium close shot of DOYLE and the KID, DOYLE eating and
drinking.

                         DOYLE
            Can you stand a toss, Hector?

                         KID
            What you mean?

                         DOYLE
            You still dealin' shit?

                         KID
            Jesus, no, Doyle.  I'm clean.  I'm
            working twelve hours a day here.

Close shot of DOYLE talking around a mouthful of doughnut.

                         DOYLE
            When they going to make you chairman
            of the board?

Medium close shot of DOYLE and the KID.  DOYLE puts down the
coffee cup.  Waves the KID closer.  The KID moves closer,
DOYLE frisks him quickly, expertly, then rips up the kid's
jacket and takes a 12-inch toadsticker out of the kid's
waistband.

Close shot of DOYLE looking at the knife, snapping the
button and watching the blade flash out.

                         DOYLE
            You clean your fingernails with this.

Close shot of KID.

                         KID
            Rather be caught with it than
            without it.

                                                           65.


DOYLE, pushing button and letting the blade fall into closed
position.

                         DOYLE
            Yeah, I guess so.

DOYLE hands the knife back to the kid.  HECTOR goes back to
work.  DOYLE eats.

EXT. DAN'S LUNCH - DAY

DOYLE climbing back into his car, knees on the seat, reaching
over into the back.

Close shot over the rear seat of DOYLE picking up the straw
hat, which has been jammed into the corner by the contours
of the Hooker's tail.  He straightens it as much as possible
and throws it under the driver's seat.

EXT. MADISON AVENUE - DAY

Medium shot of DOYLE on foot popeyeing up Madison Avenue in
the vicinity of the Westbury.  As unobtrusively as possible,
he's looking for the tail that should be there covering
CHARNIER.  DOYLE is on the East side of the street, and the
Westbury is on the West.  He pokes his head into a couple of
doorways, checks the cars parked at the curb, looks up to a
couple of the mezzanine shops along the street.  He sees
PHIL KLEIN and ANOTHER AGENT talking together totally
oblivious to the front entrance.  MULDERIG in a cigar store
looks to his wristwatch, then goes inside the store.

Close shot of DOYLE frowning, puzzled.  There doesn't seem
to be anybody alert.  He looks over to the hotel.

Westbury Hotel entrance from DOYLE's Point of View.  CHARNIER
steps out of hotel entrance, turns south.  The two AGENTS
and MULDERIG have not seen his exit.

Close on DOYLE in a doorway.

CHARNIER, carrying an umbrella, strolling blithely down the
street, in DOYLE's direction but on the opposite side of the
street.  Zoom in on his face, reflecting no concern, no
problems, then zoom back to DOYLE's position.  Pan to the
hotel entrance as DOYLE looks for somebody else.  Where the
hell is CHARNIER's surveillance?

Very quickly, DOYLE's nervous glances.

CHARNIER close.

A long view of the street.

                                                           66.


CHARNIER moving along.

The hotel entrance.

Close shot of DOYLE going through the glancing movements,
his eyes showing CHARNIER getting farther and farther down
Madison Avenue.  But there's still nobody following him.

Medium close shot of DOYLE scrambling out of the doorway and
moving down the street after CHARNIER.

Rear view of CHARNIER stopping at a newsstand, buying a copy
of the Times.

DOYLE in a doorway, peering out and down the street.

Medium close front view of CHARNIER strolling along, glancing
at the headlines of the Times, an umbrella hooked over his
left forearm as he walks.

Close shot of CHARNIER's polished shoes, moving quickly down
subway entrance stairs.  Hold on the empty stairs.  Then
DOYLE's painful, scuffed shoes, follow.

EXT. SUBWAY PLATFORM - DAY

Close shot CHARNIER standing on the subway platform, looking
at the Times, glancing toward the tracks and the rumble of a
train in the distance.

Side rear view of CHARNIER close in the foreground, DOYLE
moving into view in the background, not looking toward
CHARNIER, keeping his face turned mostly away from the
Frenchman.

Long shot of the platform.  DOYLE right, CHARNIER left as
the train pulls in.  CHARNIER is folding up his paper to
board.  DOYLE is moving toward the train.

INT. TRAIN

CHARNIER getting on train toward camera.

Close side shot DOYLE getting on train, leaning over to look
after CHARNIER's movements.

EXT. SUBWAY PLATFORM

CHARNIER getting off train.

DOYLE puzzled, hesitating, then getting off his car.

Long shot of CHARNIER opening the Times again.

                                                           67.


Medium shot of DOYLE moving quickly to phone booth against
the wall.

DOYLE close, barking into the phone.

                         DOYLE
            I'm sittin' on Frog One.

MULDERIG in phone booth at Westbury.

                         MULDERIG
            Yeah, we got the Westbury covered
            like a tent.

DOYLE

                         DOYLE
            The Westbury?  Balls.  I got him
            down at the subway at Times Square.
            What the hell's goin' on?  I make
            him coming right out of the hotel
            free as a bird.  Not a soul awake.

Close shot of CHARNIER strolling past the telephone booth,
DOYLE looking down.

                         DOYLE
            I don't care how many bartenders
            are sick.  I don't work in that
            joint.  What the hell kind of a
            union are you running down there?

Long view of CHARNIER and DOYLE about thirty feet apart on
the platform, a second train approaching.

INT. SUBWAY TRAIN

A close view of DOYLE just inside the doors of the car
sneaking a peek at the platform.  We can see that CHARNIER
is not there.  He's on the train.  Suddenly CHARNIER
reappears on the platform.  DOYLE steps off.

EXT. SUBWAY PLATFORM

Long view from DOYLE's vantage point of CHARNIER standing
with his back to the train, looking up like a man who can't
make up his mind, then turning to his left, away from DOYLE
and getting back on the train.

INT. SUBWAY TRAIN

View from interior of DOYLE car of JIMMY DOYLE nipping back
onto car.

                                                           68.


INT. TRAIN - CHARNIER'S CAR

Close view of subway doors hissing shut and an umbrella
being raised at the last moment by an off-camera hand
(CHARNIER's).  The doors jerk open in the safety spasm.
There is a blur of the a fabric moving across the camera,
blocking the view of the doors.  It is only a moment.  When
it clears, the doors are closed again, the umbrella is gone.
But we don't know what happened and the train isn't moving.

INT. SUBWAY TRAIN - DOYLE'S CAR

Rear close view of DOYLE peeking into the forward car to see
where CHARNIER is sitting.

INT. TRAIN - CHARNIER'S CAR

Quick, shocked close view of that car, revealing that
CHARNIER isn't there among the twenty passengers dozing or
moping in their seats.  There is a blurred flash as if
DOYLE's own eyes are spinning frantically back to the
windows of his own car.

EXT. SUBWAY PLATFORM

Medium shot of DOYLE jumping out of train, CHARNIER jumping
back on - train takes off.

INT. SUBWAY TRAIN - CHARNIER'S CAR

A close view of CHARNIER's face.  He is smiling directly at
DOYLE.  He gives him a little wave.

A view from CHARNIER's position of DOYLE chasing the train,
anger and hatred and frustration storming across his face.

EXT. HENRY HUDSON PARKWAY - MOSHOLU EXIT

A long view from the bottom of the steep embankments above
Harlem River Drive in Washington Heights.  Sprayed along the
face of the cliff is a disaster -- an overturned city bus
and a car with which it apparently collided.  The scene is
lighted with flares.  Police rescue WORKERS and FIREMEN are
scrambling up and down the face of the cliff.  They are
carrying BODIES out of the bus and the car, COPS pulling
them out through the windows, leading them on stretchers.
There are shouted orders and some moans and cries from the
wreckage.  In the foreground is LT. WALTER SIMONSON, involved
in the operation, but also involved in a hassle with DOYLE,
MULDERIG and RUSSO who are standing with him.  An officer
approaches SIMONSON with a set of heroin works.

                                                           69.


                         OFFICER
                   (to SIMONSON)
            This belonged to the kid who was
            drivin' the sports car.  17 years
            old.  His girlfriend OD'd in the
            car.  We found this set of works in
            her arm.

Medium close shot of DOYLE and SIMONSON.  DOYLE couldn't
care if Rome was burning on the hill; he's only interested
in his case.

                         DOYLE
                   (to MULDERIG)
            Where the hell was the surveillance?
            "Go to bed." That's all you could
            say.  You couldn't keep track of a
            bleeding elephant in a snowbank.

SIMONSON, eyes on the hill, glancing to DOYLE with irritation.

                         SIMONSON
            Jimmy, it doesn't matter anymore.
            If there was a deal it must have
            gone down by now.  We blew it!  We
            blew our cover and we blew the
            warrants --

                         MULDERIG
            Charnier and his wife checked out
            of the Westbury.  Nicoli checked
            out of the Edison --

                         RUSSO
            This fella Nicoli's got a record in
            France, Walter.  He's wanted for
            questioning in the murder of a
            French cop.

                         DOYLE
            I say we keep sittin' on Boca.

                         MULDERIG
            That's crazy.  You lost the Frog in
            the subway and you blew our cover.
            If they haven't moved already
            they're not gonna move now.

                         DOYLE
            Walter, I can make this case if the
            Feds will get the hell out of my way.

                                                           70.


                         MULDERIG
            With pleasure -- it's all yours.
            Walter, if anything develops outta
            this charade give me a call.

Medium shot of SIMONSON, DOYLE, MULDERIG and RUSSO.  Lights
flashing around them; stretchers going by with bodies.

                         RUSSO
                   (to MULDERIG)
            My ass.  The only reason you're in
            this is because you've got a big
            expense account for buying junk and
            you like to see your picture in the
            papers.

                         DOYLE
                   (to SIMONSON)
            This is my case.  Get these guys
            off my back and let me handle it.

SIMONSON

                         SIMONSON
            For chrissake, will you come off
            that "my case" bullshit.  This has
            been a whore's dream from the start.

DOYLE, close.

                         DOYLE
            The deal hasn't gone down yet
            Walter -- I know it, I can feel it.

Close shot of MULDERIG

                         MULDERIG
            The last time you were dead certain
            we ended up with a dead cop.

A fist, DOYLE's, comes from off-camera and connects with
MULDERIG's chin.  As his head flies back.

DOYLE and MULDERIG slugging and grappling with each other,
RUSSO leaping in to yank them apart.  SIMONSON grabbing
MULDERIG's arm and holding him back.

SIMONSON, close.

                         SIMONSON
                   (roaring)
            That's enough.  Get the hell out of
            here.

                                                           71.


DOYLE

Shot of SIMONSON, MULDERIG, DOYLE, RUSSO, in a cluster.

                         SIMONSON
                   (on way up hill,
                   turning back)
            Jimmy, you wasted two months - no
            collars are comin' in while you two
            been out jerkin' off.  Now go back
            to work, you're off Special
            Assignment.

EXT. LA GUARDIA AIRPORT - DAY

Medium close side view of SAL BOCA's Mercury pulling to the
Washington-Boston shuttle parking lot at La Guardia airport.
SAL takes his ticket from the automatic vendor and drives in.
We hold for the next car driven by PHIL KLEIN, a federal
narcotics agent who is on his tail.

INT. AIRPORT - DAY

Medium close shot of SAL BOCA writing out the ticket order
form.

Close shot of the form; SAL filling it out in an almost
illiterate scrawl.  Under destination SAL fills in Washing...
and the camera raises its eye to a close shot of PHIL KLEIN
on the opposite side of the counter, filling in his form.

Close side shot of PHIL KLEIN standing right behind SAL in
the shuttle line.

EXT. DEPT. OF COMMERCE, WASHINGTON, D.C. - DAY

CHARNIER and an UNDERSECRETARY on the steps of the building,
shaking hands.  Two other OFFICIALS are on hand and while we
don't hear their conversation, their manner is extremely
attentive to CHARNIER.

                         CHARNIER
            It has been highly informative and
            a personal pleasure to see you again.

                         UNDERSECRETARY
            I only hope we cut through to some
            meaningful proposals in the next
            month or so.  The pleasure was
            mine, Mr. Charnier.  When will we
            see you again?

                         CHARNIER
            Soon, probably in the Spring.

                                                           72.


Close shot of CHARNIER.

                         CHARNIER
            Goodbye.

                         UNDERSECRETARY
                   (off camera)
            Goodbye.  Good trip home.

EXT. WASHINGTON STREET - DAY

Medium long shot of CHARNIER walking across street,
diagonally toward the camera, removing the identification
card from his lapel.

Rear close shot of CHARNIER joining SAL BOCA on the sidewalk
and the two of them moving off together.

Close shot of SAL, somewhat nervous about trying to peddle
his problems to CHARNIER.

                         SAL
            Everything's smooth.  Beautiful.  I
            will need a few more days though,
            the boys think we oughta cool it
            for awhile -- make sure there's no
            heat.

                         CHARNIER
                   (manner outwardly pleasant)
            You must take me for an imbecile.
            Why do you think I asked you to
            meet me in Washington?  I haven't
            spent five minutes in New York City
            without the company of a gendarme.

                         SAL
            Look, I'll level with you -- I need
            a little more time -- I got to
            shift gears.

                         CHARNIER
            Are you having trouble raising the
            half million?

                         SAL
            Hell no -- my end is covered -- my
            associates just feel we ought to
            wait for a more opportune time to
            make the switch.

Stop, Cover.

                                                           73.


                         CHARNIER
            It has to be by the end of this week.

                         SAL
            Look, Mr. Charnier, you got to be
            reasonable.

                         CHARNIER
            It's your problem.

                         SAL
            It's yours too!

Full length shot of CHARNIER and BOCA, CHARNIER leaning over
to shake his hand.

                         CHARNIER
            So nice to have seen you again.

CHARNIER turns and walks off, leaving SAL looking after him
as we zoom back to a Point of View about a hundred yards
down the street.

Close of PHIL KLEIN, just watching.

INT. AIRPLANE - DAY

Close shot of MRS. CHARNIER, sitting by the window of two
seats on the shuttle, looking out and babbling at CHARNIER.
(DIALOGUE IN FRENCH).

                         MARIE
            Look, darling, they sell these at
            the Smithsonian.

She extracts a necklace and bracelet of shark's teeth from
an elegant alligator bag.

Camera moves back to take in CHARNIER looking from the Wall
Street Journal to the native craft bracelets.

                         CHARNIER
            Are you sure it is dead?

                         MARIE
            I'm going to put them on the cat.

                         CHARNIER
            That's a relief.

Close shot of CHARNIER, tenderly, lovingly.

                                                           74.


                         CHARNIER
            You did find something for yourself,
            of course.

MARIE, close.

                         MARIE
            Of course.  But I am not going to
            tell you what it is until we are
            back in Marseilles.

CHARNIER and MARIE.  He folds up the paper, smiling at her.

                         CHARNIER
            Excuse me a moment, darling.

CHARNIER's view of the plane interior, walking back toward
the rear of the cabin.  The seats are occupied by military-
business-government TYPES making the shuttle run.  Not every
seat is filled.  We come to an empty one on which someone
has deposited an attache case.  It is the seat next to
PIERRE NICOLI, whose hand reaches out to remove it and we
follow the arm to NICOLI's face.

Close shot of CHARNIER and NICOLI sitting. (DIALOGUE IN
FRENCH)

                         CHARNIER
            I'm afraid they've become a bit...
            over-cautious.  Our American friends.

                         NICOLI
            What happens to the schedule?

                         CHARNIER
            We must follow it.

                         NICOLI
            But will they?

CHARNIER shrugs.

                         CHARNIER
            I don't know.  Boca is scared.
            He's not strong enough.  He sees
            policemen in his soup.

                         NICOLI
            He is not wrong.

                         CHARNIER
            Mmmmm.  That bastard who followed
            me on the subway, he's the eager one.

                                                           75.


                         NICOLI
            Let me take him out.

Close of CHARNIER.

                         CHARNIER
            There'll be someone else.

                         NICOLI
            What difference does it make?
            We'll be out of the country Friday.

Close shot of CHARNIER alone.

EXT. SIDEWALK OUTSIDE DOYLE'S APARTMENT BLDG. - DAY

A complex of buildings similar to Lefrak City.  A medium
close view of a LITTLE GIRL about to run DOYLE down with a
two-wheel bicycle.  Two shots ring out in quick succession
and tear up the concrete at a point where he would have been
walking a moment earlier.

DOYLE diving for the cover of a tree.  The rifle goes off a
third time and MOTHERS begin to scream on the benches of the
playground area.

                         DOYLE
                   (yelling)
            Everybody, down!  Get down on the
            ground!

DOYLE behind the tree, pulling his gun out of the ankle
holster.  He holds the gun ready and tries to look around.
Ping, another shot that drives him back.

Long panning view, DOYLE's view, from the ground, of all the
rooftops in the area.  A blank.  The background sound is
still screaming crying. "Call the police." "The man's got a
gun." "Help!  Help!" The view is still slow, careful under
the pressure of the panic.  There's another shot.

Long shot of rifle smoke rising from NICOLI's sniper position.

Exterior view of the concrete tunnels, DOYLE running from
them toward the building, dodging and ducking behind
playground equipment and benches as he does.  He's shouting
as he runs.

                         DOYLE
            Get down!  It's a sniper.  Get down!

Medium shot of DOYLE dashing into the lobby of his building
to a Spanish kid in the window of building.

                                                           76.


EXT. ROOFTOP - DAY

Exterior shot of rooftop door opening slowly, DOYLE coming
through the opening, gun at the ready.

Panning shot of the rooftop, DOYLE's view, stopping for a
beat at the rifle and box of cartridges lying beside the
parapet, moving on.  The roof's empty.  DOYLE sees NICOLI
below, grabs rifle and cartridge.

DOYLE running to the parapet, looking over.

Shot of the street, traffic, elevated tracks in the distance.
Long searching look of the streets and the people.  The
view, which is DOYLE's, passes over one man in a dark suit,
stops and goes back.  Zap!  It's NICOLI walking quickly but
not in any panic toward the El.

DOYLE's face.  He runs to parapet, fires at NICOLI.  Misses.

DOYLE running across the roof and through the door.

DOYLE bursting out of the elevator at the bottom, through a
crowd of WOMEN and KIDS who scream as they did in the
playground.

Medium close view of DOYLE running as fast as he can.

Medium close shot of the entrance to the El.  DOYLE coming
into view from off-camera, running to a stop deciding which
to take.  He runs across the street to the downtown side
from which he saw train approaching.

DOYLE going over the turnstiles in a leap, gun still in his
right hand.

EXT. PLATFORM OF EL - DAY

Broad view of platform, DOYLE emerging looking right and left.

DOYLE's view across tracks.  There's NICOLI, standing with a
group of people.

DOYLE looking up tracks to see if he can get across.

Training pulling in an opposite side.  Train pulling in
right in front of DOYLE.

                         DOYLE
            Stop that guy.  He's wanted by the
            police!

Side medium close shot of DOYLE turning and plunging back
through the doorway of platform exit.

                                                           77.


INT. TRAIN CAR - DAY

In one corner of the train is a transit policeman.  He's
observed Doyle shouting and gesturing at NICOLI who sits
nervously aware of the policeman's presence.  Long longs
between them.  Finally, the officer decides to approach
NICOLI.

NICOLI panics and runs.  The officer goes after him and
traps him against the door between cars.

INT. TOKEN BOOTH - DAY

Close shot of DOYLE with badge at token booth.

                         DOYLE
            Where's the next stop?  Going into
            the city?

                         TOKEN ATTENDANT
                   (glancing out in
                   direction the train
                   was hurtling)
            25th Avenue.

INT. TRAIN - DAY

NICOLI and the TRANSIT POLICEMAN struggle, as the handful of
passengers watch.  NICOLI pulls his .45 and clobbers the
officer on the side of the head.

Close of NICOLI going from one car to another, opening doors
on the rear, moving through yet another crowd.

EXT. STREET - DAY

Medium close shot of DOYLE running into the street, forcing
a driver to stop.  DOYLE moving so hard he falls against the
hood of the car then dashes around to the door and jerks it
open.

                         DOYLE
            Police!

Medium close shot of DOYLE dragging MIDDLE-AGED MALE DRIVER
out from behind the wheel as he shouts.

                         DRIVER
            What the hell?

                         DOYLE
                   (diving behind the wheel)
            Police!  Emergency!

                                                           78.


DOYLE has a pistol in his hand.  The man falls back
sputtering.  DOYLE jams car into gear and it roars off.

INT. SUBWAY TRAIN CAR - DAY

NICOLI pounds on the door of the Motorman's cab with his gun.

After a long moment - the door cracks open.  Close shot
NICOLI pushing his way into the cab of the subway MOTORMAN,
sixtyish, worn and frail looking.

MOTORMAN looks down.  He follows the glance to NICOLI's .45.

EXT. STREET - DAY

Side close view of DOYLE screeching to a stop to avoid
plunging into a panel truck.  DOYLE sticks his head out the
window to look up at the tracks as the DRIVER of the truck
screams.

                         TRUCK DRIVER
            Blind sonofabitch!

Overhead view of the tracks, train roaring along them.
DOYLE's view.

INT. SUBWAY TRAIN - DAY

The tracks racing by from the view of the train.  We're
approaching a station.

INT. MOTORMAN'S CABIN - DAY

NICOLI's close view of the MOTORMAN, the gun on the man.

                         NICOLI
            Don't stop!  Continue on to the
            next station!

                         MOTORMAN
            I got to stop.

                         NICOLI
            Touch the brake and I'll blow you
            in half.

                         MOTORMAN
            The signal lights are automatic.
            If I go through a red I'll be
            automatically braked.

The MOTORMAN pales, his hand goes to his left side in a
gesture of anxiety, possibly pain.

                                                           79.


EXT. SUBWAY ENTRANCE - DAY

Side close view of DOYLE screeching to a stop, the car
bumping up on the sidewalk and DOYLE plunging out the door
which he leaves hanging open.  He races around the car for
the steps to the El.

EXT. SUBWAY PLATFORM - DAY

Side view of train roaring through the station without
stopping.

INT. SUBWAY TRAIN - DAY

Medium close shot of CROWD on train pushing toward the
MOTORMAN's cab.  They are upset over the missed stop.  The
CONDUCTOR seems to be the most annoyed.

He's pushing hardest toward the camera to complain.

                         VOICES
            Didn't stop.
            Went right through there...
            Hey, man, that's my station...
            Where the hell's he going?
            Hey, stop the car...

Close shot of NICOLI's back, half in the MOTORMAN's cab, as
he faces the CROWD.  Now the cries turn to:

                         VOICES
            He's got a gun...
            The motorman's gone crazy...
            Oh my God!

                         NICOLI
            Get back.

                         CONDUCTOR
            Hey, you can't...

Side view of NICOLI, the MOTORMAN in the background the
CONDUCTOR leaping at NICOLI.  NICOLI burns him; one gut shot.
The car turns to pandemonium of screams.  The CONDUCTOR is
hurled back into the crowd by force of the blast.  The
MOTORMAN throws back his head in fright, and the beginning
of a coronary.

EXT/INT. DOYLE'S CAR - DAY

Close shot of DOYLE from back seat, twisting, turning the
car in a wild demonstration of pursuit driving around cars,
braking, roaring ahead.

                                                           80.


We move out through the windshield for a lurching, spinning,
twisting view of the tracks overhead, the street signs and
lights flashing by in a reeling montage of movement, the
train roaring above it all.

INT. SUBWAY TRAIN - DAY

Close side shot of NICOLI turning to cover the MOTORMAN, who
is clutching in pain, slumping toward the controls.

                         MOTORMAN
                   (gasping)
            I can't breathe.

NICOLI glances quickly to his left, out the window to the
next station.

Long, low view of the tracks, partially NICOLI's view.
There are red blinkers on the side of the tracks.  Red
lights up ahead.  That's the back of another train.  It has
stopped and we're hurtling toward it.

Wide shot of screaming pack of subway riders, fighting their
way back from NICOLI, succeeding only in turning themselves
into a tightly contained mob.  Now the words they cry are:

                         VOICES
            We'll crash.
            Won't somebody please help me.
            Murder
            He's a killer.
            Crash.  We'll crash!
            Stop.  Stop the train.

EXT. DOYLE'S CAR - DAY

Side close view of DOYLE driving while he's looking up.  He
skids through a red light, narrowly missing a pedestrian and
an oncoming group of cars.

Long, low view of the train from DOYLE's position.

INT. SUBWAY TRAIN - DAY

Close shot of cord dangling above a sign that says "Pull for
Emergency Stop Only." It just dangles, wobbles, forgotten in
the panic.

EXT. DOYLE'S CAR - DAY

Close side shot of DOYLE driving, skidding on streetcar
tracks, panning upward to show the car pulling ahead of the
train.

                                                           81.


INT. SUBWAY TRAIN - DAY

Close shot of NICOLI from behind, looking out the window of
the car where we see ourselves hurtling toward the other
train, now only about 100 yards away.  Hold on the train
ahead.  The MOTORMAN collapses over the throttle.

Rear close shot of NICOLI plunging into the panicky riders
with gun in hand, trying to get out with them to some rear
car.

EXT. SUBWAY STATION - DAY

Medium close of DOYLE arriving at the station.

INT. SUBWAY CAR - DAY

Back end of subway car looming up at high speed.

EXT. 62ND STREET STATION - THE TRACKS - DAY

The leader train sits waiting about twenty yards out of the
station.  As the onrushing train approaches, it passes
through the yellow signal light at the rear of the station.

EXT. CLOSE SHOT THE TRIP LOCK - DAY

As the onrushing car pulls equal to the red signal light at
the front of the station, the tiny trip lock on the track
springs up, activating the safety brake.  The trains avoid
collision by a few feet as the front car screeches to a halt.

INT. THE ONRUSHING TRAIN - DAY

The passengers are thrown violently to the ground.

NICOLI gets to his feet and forces open one of the doors.

EXT. 62ND STREET TRACKS - DAY

NICOLI makes his way out of the train and runs along the
tracks for a few yards, narrowly avoiding the third rail.
He climbs onto the station platform, to the shock and
amazement of several onlookers.  He is dazed and disheveled,
no longer a hunter.

EXT. ENTRANCE TO THE 62ND STREET STATION - DAY

NICOLI staggers down the stairs to the street, unarmed.

DOYLE is waiting at the foot of the stairs.

NICOLI sees him, turns in desperation to run back up.

                                                           82.


DOYLE has his .38 drawn.  He fires three shots into NICOLI's
back.

NICOLI stiffens and falls backward coming to rest at DOYLE's
feet.  DOYLE collapses next to him.

EXT. CANDY STORE - DAY

SAL and ANGIE emerge and get into the Mercury.

EXT. MANHATTAN STREET - DAY

Long shot of the Mercury stopped.  SAL gets out and walks
quickly to the garage entrance and down the ramp as ANGIE
drives off in the Mercury.  Pan to

EXT/INT. DOYLE'S CAR - DAY

Close shot of DOYLE and RUSSO from the front.  DOYLE looks
after ANGIE's car.

INT. GARAGE - DAY

Medium close shot of RUSSO from the rear as he walks down
the ramp toward a glass attendant's booth in the background.
We pan around the garage looking for SAL but don't find him.
As RUSSO approaches the booth, we see the figure of a man
partially obscured by the door and the entrance framework.

Close shot of RUSSO from the front.

                         RUSSO
            Hey, Mac, have you seen...?

Close shot of the man turning.  It is SAL BOCA.

Close shot of RUSSO and BOCA in face-to-face confrontation.

                         RUSSO
            ...the guy who runs this joint?

There's a tense pause as BOCA looks at RUSSO.

Close shot of BOCA.

                         SAL
            Yeh.  He's over getting my car.

Medium close shot of GARAGE ATTENDANT holding the door of
the Lincoln open for SAL, shutting it and taking the ticket
from the windshield.  As BOCA puts car in gear and drives
off, we pan to BUDDY RUSSO standing there watching.  The
ATTENDANT walks up.

                                                           83.


                         ATTENDANT
            Can I help you...?

Medium close shot of ATTENDANT and RUSSO.  BUDDY, ignoring
the ATTENDANT, watching the Lincoln take off, then breaking
loose and running toward the ramp.

Close shot of RUSSO from DOYLE's viewpoint, piling into the
car.

                         RUSSO
            He's in the brown Lincoln - foreign
            plates.

Close shot of DOYLE throwing the car into gear and shooting
down the street.

Long view of the street from DOYLE's windshield of the
Lincoln in the distance.  We pick up speed and weave through
traffic in pursuit.

EXT. STREETS - DAY

Impressionistic shot of Lincoln and DOYLE's car winding
through Brooklyn streets.

Long shot of the Lincoln, SAL BOCA parking it, getting out
and locking the doors, looking around and walking away.

The Mercury comes around a corner, ANGIE at the wheel.  The
car stops and SAL gets in.

As the Mercury takes off, Detective PHIL KLEIN follows in
his car.

Close shot of DOYLE and RUSSO in their car parked several
car lengths and across the street from the Lincoln.

NIGHT

Long shot of the Lincoln, zooming on the glittering car.  In
the BG, eight youngsters are playing a game of street hockey.

INT. DOYLE'S CAR - NIGHT

Close shot through windshield of DOYLE and RUSSO.  MULDERIG
and KLEIN in their car.

                         DOYLE
            Timezit?

                         RUSSO
            Four.

                                                           84.


EXT. DOYLE'S CAR - NIGHT

Long view over the hood of DOYLE's car to the street.  We
can see the Lincoln.  The lights of a car appear on the left
and come down the street past the Lincoln, slowly, like a
man looking for a place to park.  We can make out, but just
barely with the help of the street lights, four people in
the car.

DOYLE in close profile, the foreground, picking up a corner
of the Lincoln in the background.  While we are looking in
silence, there is a glimmering flow in the far corner, the
beginning of approaching headlights again.  They grown
brighter and DOYLE's foreground profile turns to watch it
come.

                         DOYLE
                   (softly)
            Same car.

                         RUSSO
            Third time around.

RUSSO and MULDERIG straightening up, leaning close to window
to peer out.

Long view over the hood of DOYLE's car of the approaching
vehicle, which suddenly switches off its lights and turns on
its parking blinkers.  It comes abreast of the Lincoln and
stops.  The men get out and chase the Lincoln.

View through windshield at the four men.  DOYLE is now up
straight and at the wheel.  He's leaning forward, his hand
on the key of the car.  He glances back to MULDERIG.

                         DOYLE
                   (to car radio)
            Let's him 'em.

View of the hood.  All hell breaks loose, headlights,
including DOYLE's flash on and form a spotlight on the
Lincoln and the figures around it.  Frozen in the headlights,
confused, startled, and disbelieving are FIVE PUERTO RICANS
with a variety of auto-stripping tools in their hands: lug
wrenches, tire irons, pinch bars, monkey wrenches, etc.
DOYLE drives right up to them.  The camera leaps out of the
car with him and runs toward the men.  We hear voices
shouting.

                         VOICES
            Police!  Don't move... get you...
            hands up... you're under arrest...

                                                           85.


EXT. STREET - NIGHT

Close view of DOYLE holding his gun on one of the terrorized-
looking Puerto Ricans.  The KID's hands are rising
tentatively.  He's too scared to move.

                         DOYLE
            Up!  Up, you sonofabitch!

In the background, the scene is being duplicated by two or
three others.

Overhead view of this headlight and flashlight arena of
about 10 or 12 DETECTIVES forming small clusters, throwing
these guys up against cars, pulling their arms around behind
them and throwing cuffs on them while others rapidly frisk
them for weapons, taking away one pistol, a couple of knives.

MULDERIG and DOYLE looking at their MAN up against the
Lincoln as RUSSO finishes snapping handcuffs on him.

                         DOYLE
            Of all the goddam cars they had to
            pick to steal hubcaps.

Close shot of the front end of the Lincoln, upended on a
hoist attached to a police tow truck.  The area is less
brightly lighted by headlights now.  Some cars have departed
with the Puerto Rican AUTO STRIPPERS.  DOYLE's interest
focuses on the car.  We pick him up as we pan to him sitting
on the running board of the tow truck, talking with its
DRIVER, who is making a report on a clipboard.  MULDERIG and
RUSSO are standing nearby, talking to TWO PLAINCLOTHESMEN.

                         DOYLE
                   (looking up and around)
            A bunch of lousy little spic car
            thieves.

                         MULDERIG
            Nothing in there except a New York
            street map.

                         DOYLE
            Tumble it.  One end to the other.

RUSSO jotting in his note pad, then glancing up to the off-
camera DOYLE.

DOYLE, medium close, hands jamming into his pockets, staring
at the ground with RUSSO and MULDERIG.

                                                           86.


INT. POLICE GARAGE - DAY

A montage as the Lincoln is being disassembled.  First it is
weighed.  We then see the MECHANIC drain the gas, pull apart
the transmission and check through the brake drums, rip out
the seats.

MECHANIC ducking out from under the car, moving toward off-
camera DOYLE.

                         MECHANIC
            Nobody's been under there with
            anything but a grease gun since if
            came off the line.

DOYLE's hand reaches out from off-camera and takes a
cigarette package out of the MECHANIC's pocket.

                         DOYLE
            I don't buy it.  The stuff is on
            this car.

                         MECHANIC
            Then you find it.  I can't.

INT. POLICE SERGEANT'S OFFICE AT GARAGE - DAY

Shot of DEVEREAUX and LA VALLE.

                         LA VALLE
            The car was lost sometime this
            evening.  First they send us to
            Pier One -- then they send us
            here --

                         DESK SERGEANT
            I don't understand why you had it
            parked on the waterfront.  You're
            staying at the Doral and you lose
            your car somewhere out by the
            Brooklyn Bridge.

                         LA VALLE
            In point of fact, M. Devereaux is
            scouting locations for a film for
            French Television.  He left the car
            to look at some point of interest.

                         DEVEREAUX
                   (moving, excitable)
            We were told by the Police
            Commissioner's office that the car
            was brought to this garage.  I
            demand its immediate return.

                                                           87.


                         DESK SERGEANT
            If you'll be patient, Mr. Devereaux.

                         DEVEREAUX
                   (moving)
            I have been patient enough.  There
            is no reason I should have to waste
            time with this red tape.

                         LA VALLE
            Mr. Devereaux is an extremely
            important guest of this country.
            He is working with the absolute
            cooperation and participation of
            your government.  Here are his
            credentials from the French
            Consulate.
                   (showing them)
            Unless you wish to see this episode
            portrayed in his film I suggest you
            locate his car immediately.

Shot of DOYLE and RUSSO near the Lincoln, now up on hoists.
Police MECHANIC in background.

                         MECHANIC
            What are you looking for?  Is it as
            big as an orange or an elephant's
            ass?  I've been over every inch --
            top to bottom.  If you could give
            me a club -- to the size...

                         RUSSO
                   (doing rough figures
                   on a piece of scratch paper)
            What was the weight of the car when
            you got it, Irv?

                         MECHANIC
                   (consulting his notes)
            4,839 pounds.

                         RUSSO
                   (consulting Lincoln
                   Specification Book)
            You're sure?
                   (he does quick addition)
            The manufacturer's spec says it
            should weigh 4,719 pounds.  This
            one's carrying roughly 120 extra
            pounds somewhere.

He produces a copy of a ship's manifold.

                                                           88.


                         RUSSO
            When it was booked in at Marseilles
            it weighed the same.  120 pounds
            overweight.  Jimmy has to be right.

The THREE MEN turn again to stare at the Lincoln.  The
MECHANIC lowers the hoist, thoughtfully.

                         MECHANIC
            I ripped everything out except the
            Rocker panels.

                         DEVEREAUX
            What's that?

They look at each other for a long moment.

MECHANIC starts to undo the side Rocker pans.  JIMMY pulls
the pan off and sticks his arm into the enclosure.  Feeling
around inside he pulls out the first kilo-sized plastic
container as several others start tumbling out after.  BUDDY
and DOYLE are smiling at each other as they continue to pull
the bags out.  Several of the other MECHANICS in the garage
are gathered around the happy moment.  They repeat this
action on the other side of the car.

RUSSO enters garage sergeant's bullpen.  DEVEREAUX and LA
VALLE are still arguing with the SERGEANT.

                         RUSSO
            Got it for you, Randy -- it just
            came in from downtown.  Who's
            Devereaux?

                         LA VALLE
            This is M. Devereaux.

                         RUSSO
            I'm sorry, Mr. Devereaux, but we
            get reports on a couple hundred
            vehicles a night.  Sometimes it's a
            little tough to keep track.

                         DEVEREAUX
            You mean the car's here now?

                         RUSSO
            Yeah -- fine -- it's okay -- not
            even a scratch.  You're all set.
                   (handing DEVEREAUX keys)


RUSSO walking with DEVEREAUX and LA VALLE.

                                                           89.


                         RUSSO
            Someone stole it right off the
            street, huh?  You're gonna have to
            pay the tow away charge.

                         DEVEREAUX
            I was told these things happen in
            New York -- but one never expects it.

                         RUSSO
            Yeah.  Well, it's in perfect shape.
            You must lead a charming life.

INT. HOTEL LOBBY - DORAL - DAY

Medium close shot of DEVEREAUX striding through the lobby
toward the camera. (DIALOGUE IN FRENCH)

                         CHARNIER
            Henri...

Medium close shot of DEVEREAUX turning to face CHARNIER, who
has been waiting for him.

                         CHARNIER
            Did you pick up the car?

                         DEVEREAUX
            It is waiting for you in the garage.

                         CHARNIER
            Did they follow you?

                         DEVEREAUX
            I wasn't looking.

                         CHARNIER
            Henri... I need one more favor from
            you.  I know I am imposing...

                         DEVEREAUX
            My friend, I am not sure about what
            is going on -- but for me, I am
            finished.

                         CHARNIER
            Not quite -- you are in it whether
            you like it or not.  The police
            know you brought the car into the
            country.  This makes you an
            accomplice.

                                                           90.


                         DEVEREAUX
            An accomplice to what?!  What have
            you gotten me into, Alain?  You
            asked me to do you a favor -- and I
            did what you asked -- but you've
            taken advantage of me.  I have my
            reputation --

CHARNIER pulls DEVEREAUX further aside.

                         CHARNIER
            Calm down -- Henri!  You must trust
            me -- this is an extremely
            complicated situation to which
            there is a simple solution if you
            do exactly what I tell you.  It's
            worth more money to you.

                         DEVEREAUX
            Goodbye.

DEVEREAUX turns and walks into the crowded lobby leaving
ALAIN standing alone.

EXT. HOTEL STREET - DAY

Medium close shot of the Lincoln.  We can't see the driver
immediately.  As we follow the car, it hesitates; horns
sound and it moves ahead with a jerk.

INT. LINCOLN - DAY

Close shot of CHARNIER at the wheel of the Lincoln, trying
to make out street signs and directions.

EXT. TRIBORO BRIDGE - DAY

Medium shot of the Lincoln going across the Triboro Bridge.

EXT. WARD'S ISLAND - DAY

CHARNIER's view through the windshield as he drives along
the new road and turns left on the old service road.

EXT. OLD SERVICE ROAD - WARD'S ISLAND - DAY

Hellgate Bridge overhead in BG.  Lincoln drives along old
road and into abandoned garage.

INT. WARD'S ISLAND GARAGE - DAY

View from CHARNIER's POV out the window of the building.
Faces appear beside the car.  First BOCA's, then WEINSTOCK's,
then LOU BOCA and two MECHANICS.

                                                           91.


                         BOCA
            Keep going.  Right in there.

                         FIRST MECHANIC
            Over there.  On the right.

                         SECOND MECHANIC
            The clear spot.

INT. GARAGE - DAY

Medium close shot of the Lincoln.  The Rocker panels are
open and the junk is being unloaded.  CHARNIER is standing
by two suitcases of cash.  He takes a bundle out of the
suitcase, riffs the deck of bills with his fingers to make
sure it's money all the way through; puts it in a separate
stack that will go into the rocker panels of a nearby junk
car.  WEINSTOCK is standing next to the CHEMIST, with his
testing equipment.  The MECHANICS are under the Lincoln and
passing out the kilos of heroin, BOCA is helping them.  The
kilos are concealed in the floor boards of the old garage.

Close shot of CHARNIER's hands, working on the money.

Close shot of the CHEMIST taking a sniff, then a taste.

Close shot of SAL BOCA and MECHANICS continuing to unload
packet after packet after packet of heroin.

Close shot of CHARNIER as the stacks of money are loaded
into the car.

Close shot of BOCA taking a bottle of Seagram's Seven Crown
out of a brown paper bag.

CHARNIER extends his hand.  WEINSTOCK takes it; they shake.

CHARNIER close, looking back at the car as the rocker panels
are restored to the Lincoln.  The junk car with the money
secreted is removed.

Medium shot of SAL BOCA and CHARNIER getting in the Lincoln.
In the b.g. a tow truck hauls the battered junk car out to
await shipment.

EXT. WARD'S ISLAND BRIDGE - DAY

Long view from the bridge of the Lincoln coming toward the
camera over a small rise.

View from Lincoln, between SAL and CHARNIER, over the hood
of the car and to the entrance to the bridge.  There is a
police blockade.  Standing in front of it are DOYLE, RUSSO,
MULDERIG and PHIL KLEIN.

                                                           92.


CLOSE-UP CHARNIER.

CLOSE-UP DOYLE.  He gives CHARNIER a little wave.

Long view of the Lincoln stopping in the middle of the
bridge.  Zoom in on it as SAL hurriedly turns it around,
smashing into the side of the bridge as he does.

Medium shot of the Lincoln racing back across the island.
The Mercury roars past WEINSTOCK's car, heading toward the
bridge.

WEINSTOCK's car coming to a stop.

Close shot of the CHEMIST and WEINSTOCK in the car, turning
back to the island.

INT. LINCOLN - DAY

Close shot of CHARNIER and SAL.  SAL driving, CHARNIER
looking out the back window.  The police cars, slowly, begin
to gun engines and start the pursuit.  The sirens begin to
wail.

INT. GARAGE - DAY

The Lincoln roaring into the asylum toward the camera,
screeching to a stop.  SAL and CHARNIER leaping out.  They
run toward Crematorium Building.

Medium long shot of SAL running off.

                         SAL
                   (shouting)
            Bulls!

CHARNIER hesitates.  Then runs into the darkness of the
Crematorium.

EXT. CREMATORIUM - DAY

Police cars screeching to a halt around the building.  Some
circling to the back to cut it off.  DOYLE, RUSSO, MULDERIG,
KLEIN and others getting out and running toward the entrance,
taken by the Lincoln.

EXT. JUNK GRAVEYARD - DAY

Close shot SAL BOCA and the two MECHANICS at the auto
graveyard.  The MECHANICS start to run and are pursued by
KLEIN and TWO OTHER COPS.  SAL decides to shoot it out.
RUSSO in pursuit.

                                                           93.


After a chase around the graveyard RUSSO burns SAL who dies
among the wrecked cars.

WEINSTOCK and the CHEMIST emerge from the cars.  Hands in
the air.  They give up without a struggle.

                         RUSSO
            Phil, you take that side, Bill, go
            around the other way.

INT. CREMATORIUM - DAY

Long shot, we can see somebody running, hear his footsteps,
but can't tell who it is.

Shot of DOYLE entering.

Shot of DOYLE, gun in hand, going around corner of long
corridor, looking down it.

Shot of MULDERIG running down one of the corridors and into
a cell littered with abandoned furniture, sinks, toilets, etc.

Long view of the hallway.  Halfway down, LOU pops out and
fires wildly at the camera.

DOYLE close, pulling back, then leaning out and blazing away
twice.

Long shot of LOU, staffering into the corridor and collapsing.

DOYLE running down the corridor leaping over LOU's body and
continuing to run to bisecting corridor.

INT. CELLAR - DAY

DOYLE comes down the stairs and into the cellar.  In the
foreground, behind a pile of ripped-out wall and floorboards,
there appears to be the crouched silhouette of a man.  DOYLE
exits.

DOYLE's view down second corridor.  At far end of it a
figure flitting past.

                         RUSSO
            Jimmy?

Close shot of RUSSO at the head of a flight of stairs.

                         RUSSO
            Jimmy?

DOYLE's P.O.V.: A shadow figure ducks into one of the rooms.

                                                           94.


Close of DOYLE up against a wall.

                         DOYLE
                   (a whisper)
            Cover the other side -- Frog Number
            One is down there.

RUSSO scrambling along the Crematorium wall.

DOYLE moving slowly down the opposite wall.

Medium shot of DOYLE approaching the end rooms.  A figure
slips out of one of them, shrouded with shadows.

Close of DOYLE firing twice into the camera.

Close shot of the figure.  It's AGENT BILL MULDERIG spinning,
dropping, his own service revolver clattering on the concrete.

Medium close shot of DOYLE standing over MULDERIG's body,
two or three COPS coming up, including RUSSO.

                         RUSSO
                   (leaning over the body)
            He's gone, Jimmy.  Bill is dead.

DOYLE full figure, close.  A long pause -- and then --

                         DOYLE
            The sonofabitch is in here somewhere.
            I saw him -- I'm gonna get him.

DOYLE exits down the corridor.  The others staring after him.

EXT. CREMATORIUM

Within the building no one is visible.  Overhead, the
Hellgate Bridge, sounds of New York, jets, auto traffic, and
an approaching Penn Central train.

                           THE END



TitleFrench Connection, The (1971)
TypeText
Size159.642 kB
Date Added2008-09-10
Views2634
CategoryMovie Scripts
Placement